Harry S. Truman Presidential Library & Museum

Truman, Harry S., 1884-1972; Blandford, John Bennett, 1897-1972; Schwellenbach, Lewis B. (Lewis Baxter), 1894-1948; Forrestal, James, 1892-1949; Acheson, Dean, 1893-1971; Vinson, Fred M., 1890-1953; Hannegan, Robert E. (Robert Emmet), 1903-1949; Wallace,
Cabinet meetings; Nuclear energy

Cabinet Meeting Minutes, November 16, 1945. Matthew J. Connelly Papers - Notes on Cabinet Meetings I.

CABINET MEETING, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1945

PROPOSED AGENDA

1. Further discussion of the atomic bomb.

THE PRESIDENT

Asked for comment with respect to agreement with Prime Minister Attlee and McKenzie King. Stated that the objective of this agreement was to secure a free interchange of scientific knowledge as he was desirous of preventing the use of atomic energy for war until international control can be achieved.

SECRETARY VINSON

Said that the agreement looked satisfactory to him but was very desirous of first making sure that other nations are to contribute something as well as the United States.

SECRETARY ACHESON

Expressed the opinion that the agreement was a good one.

ATTORNEY GENERAL CLARK

Thought the agreement was o.k. but would like to maintain safeguards on the know-how relating to the use of atomic energy.

SECRETARY PATTERSON

Thinks the people generally will support the agreement. It has met the promise made by the President in his message to Congress. It goes further and uses the United Nations Organization as a means of bringing about peaceful use of atomic energy.

SECRETARY FORRESTAL

It makes UNO a living thing. He believes the people will want assurance that Russia will play ball.

POSTMASTER GENERAL HANNEGAN

People will want to know what Russian reaction to the program will be.

SECRETARY WALLACE

He believes the agreement comes as close as possible to his own views. However, he questions the language in sections 7, 8 and 9 of the agreement.

SECRETARY SCHWELLENBACH

Believes that the agreement gives new vigor to the UNO.

GENERAL FLEMING

Considers the agreement a great step forward. Believes the American people will react very favorably.

MR. BLANDFORD

Hopes that the Commission will be soon organized and begin to function so that industrial usage may be quickly determined.

THE PRESIDENT

Asked Secretary Schwellenbach how his own "atomic bomb" was coming along.

SECRETARY SCHWELLENBACH

Believes he is making some progress and is hopeful that things will be worked out soon.

POSTMASTER GENERAL HANNEGAN

Says the Cabinet should now get behind the President's Message to Congress. Particularly the Minimum Wage Bill.

SECRETARY FORRESTAL

Seconds this suggestion and again stressed that members of the Cabinet should not make speeches conflicting with the views of the President. Every effort should be made by Cabinet members to sell the President's program.

JOHN SNYDER

We must move quickly in setting up machinery for development of industrial use of atomic energy. Believed that effective controls should be set up to protect our economic interests and wants Cabinet members to personally solicit aid of Senators to get behind the Minimum Wage Bill.


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