Harry S. Truman Presidential Library & Museum


Nuremberg Trials
Author:
Jesse McClain
Course:
US History, Composition
Time Frame:
1 or 2 class Sessions
Subjects:
Nuremberg War Crimes Trials
,
World War II

Grade Levels:
8, 9, 10, 11, 12

Classroom/Homework Activity to be performed:

Interactive Lecture

Rationale:

•This lesson was designed to provide the students who learn in the visual mode a means to successfully interpret and experience the Nuremberg Trials on a unique nonstandard plane and to express their thoughts through writing.

District, state, or national performance and knowledge standards/goals/skills met:


•National Standards Met: 4, 5, 8

SHOW ME STANDARDS

2. Continuity and change in the history of Missouri, the United States and the world

6. Relationships of the individual and groups to institutions and cultural traditions

7. The use of tools of social science inquiry (such as surveys, statistics, maps, documents)

KANSAS STANDARDS (High School-US History)

Benchmark 5: The student engages in historical thinking skills.

1. (A) analyzes a theme in world history to explain patterns of continuity and change over time.

2. (A) develops historical questions on a specific topic in world history and analyzes the evidence in primary source documents to speculate on the answers.

3. (A) uses primary and secondary sources about an event in world history to develop a credible interpretation of the event, forming conclusions about its meaning (e.g., use provided primary and secondary sources to interpret a historical-based conclusion).

Secondary materials (book, article, video documentary, etc.) needed:

•Source Reference: www.trumanlibrary.org

Primary materials (book, article, video documentary, etc.) needed:

NA

Technology Required:

•PowerPoint Capability Required

Full description of activity or assignment.

Detailed Procedure is part of the Power Point: Nuremberg Trials

 

Full explanation of the assessment method and/or scoring guide:

ESSAY RUBRIC FOR ACADEMIC WRITING

 

 

 

•“A” essays will: 

•have a strong introduction with an effective attention-getter and clear thesis statement; •have a topic sentence in each body that explains how the supporting point relates to the thesis; •organize the main points so that the essay builds chronologically or logically; •smoothly introduce quotations and/or examples, organizing them effectively in the paragraph •select examples that effectively support the topic sentence and fully explain their significance; •make use of well-selected, significant quotations (as relevant) and specific examples or details; •effectively conclude the essay by showing the significance of the topic; •use advanced and precise vocabulary; use transitions to effectively link paragraphs and sentences; •follow formal essay rules: avoid using slang, trite expressions, and saying “you” and "I"; •be virtually free of grammar, punctuation, and usage errors; keep a consistent verb tense.

 •“B” essays will:  •have a good introduction with a  relevant attention-getter and clear thesis statement; •have a topic sentence in each body paragraph that explains how the main point relates to the thesis; •organize the main points so that the essay builds chronologically or logically; •introduce quotations and examples, organizing them effectively in the paragraph •clearly support thesis with examples and explain their significance to the topic; •conclude the essay by showing the significance of the topic; •use grade-level vocabulary and use transitions to link ideas; could use more quotations and details for support; •follow formal essay rules: avoid using slang, trite expressions, and saying “you” and "I"; •be mostly free of grammar, punctuation, and usage errors; keep a consistent verb tense.      

•“C” essays will:         

  •have an adequate introduction, thesis, body, and conclusion that responds to the topic; •contain quotations and examples that relate to the topic; •need some improvement on overall organization or paragraph organization; •need to improve topic sentences; need transitions between paragraphs/ between examples; •need to explain examples more to show how they relate to the topic sentence/thesis; •need more development of paragraphs in responding to the topics; •need more examples and support, or need more specific examples; •have supporting points that overlap in proof or are not equal in size and scope. •usually avoid slang and saying “you”; may sometimes use inconsistent verb tense; •may present incorrect information when explaining details, events, or situations from the novel; •have some serious usage, grammar, or punctuation errors.

•“D” essays will:                         

 •lack a clear thesis, introduction, or conclusion; lack understanding of the topic; •lack attention to the topic/thesis/theme in the paragraphs and/or examples presented; •lack accuracy in explaining examples or details; •lack examples or use of quotations;  •lack paragraph development, paragraph organization or overall organization; •need to avoid slang and saying “you”; may sometimes use inconsistent verb tense; •use illogical explanations to try to prove the points; have serious usage, grammar, and/or punctuation.

•“D-” or “F” are seriously flawed in terms of addressing the topic and/or assignment.

 

•WRITING RUBRIC

•5 •Accomplished Writing •-Focused on topic •-Logical progression of ideas •-Sentence structure varied •-Mature understanding of writing conventions •-Specific details

 •4 •Proficient Writing •-Focused on topic and includes few, if any, loosely related ideas •-Transitional devices strengthen organization •-Occasional errors; word choice is adequate •-Commonplace understanding of writing conventions •-Some specific details; support is loosely developed

•3 •Basic Writing •-Focused but may contain ideas that are loosely connected to the •topic •-Lacks logical progression of ideas •-General conventions are used •-Partial, limited understanding of writing conventions •-Development of support is uneven

 •2 •Limited Writing •-Addresses topic but may lose focus by including loosely related •topics •-Includes a beginning, middle, and end, but these elements may be •brief •-Errors in basic conventions, but common words are spelled correctly •-Definite misunderstanding of writing conventions •-Development of support is erratic and nonspecific

•1 •Poor Writing •-Addresses topic but may focus by including loosely related ideas •-Has an organizational pattern but may lack completeness or closure •-Frequent and blatant errors in basic conventions; commonly used •words may be misspelled •-Obvious misunderstanding of writing conventions •-Little if any development of the supporting ideas; support may •consist of generalizations or fragmentary lists