Harry S. Truman Presidential Library & Museum

Public Papers
Harry S. Truman
1945-1953


View by Month and Year

Search Public Papers
Enter keyword:
AND OR NOT
Limit by Year
From:
To    :

Limit results per page
Instructions
You can search the Public Papers in two ways:

1. View by Month and Year
Select the month and year you would like information about and press View Public Papers. Then choose the Public Paper in that month and year, and the page will load for you.

2. Search by Keyword and Year
You can also search by keyword and choose the range of years within your search by filling out the boxes under Search Public Papers.


Provided courtesy of The American Presidency Project.  John Woolley and Gerhard Peters. University of California, Santa Barbara.
  102. Remarks of Welcome to the Prime Minister of Pakistan at the Washington National Airport  
May 3, 1950

Mr. Prime Minister, Begum Sahiba:

With a deep sense of the historical import of this occasion, and with the greatest personal pleasure, I am happy to welcome you both to the United States. Mrs. Truman and I, and the Americans throughout our country, have been looking forward to your arrival. We are glad you have found it possible to do us the honor of visiting us, and are thankful that you have been granted a safe journey.

The many Americans who have had the privilege of visiting Pakistan are unanimous in their praise of your heart-warming hospitality. I hope that while you are in the United States you will feel as much at home as Americans do when they visit your great country. It is likewise my sincere hope that in the course of your stay you will find that Americans and Pakistanis have much in common.

Knowing that the number of invitations from Americans wishing to extend hospitality has far exceeded the number which your sojourn in the United States will permit you to accept, I wish at this time to extend a warm and heartfelt welcome on behalf of all the American people.

NOTE: The President spoke at 4:05 p.m. Prime Minister Liaquat All Khan and his wife, the Begurn Sahiba, had arrived in Washington to begin an extended tour of the United States and Canada.
 
Provided courtesy of The American Presidency Project.  John Woolley and Gerhard Peters. University of California, Santa Barbara.