Harry S. Truman Presidential Library & Museum

Public Papers
Harry S. Truman
1945-1953

President Harry S. Truman.  Source: Truman Library.

The Public Papers of Harry S. Truman contain most of President Truman's public messages, statements, speeches, and news conference remarks. Documents such as Proclamations, Executive Orders, and similar documents that are published in the Federal Register and the Code of Federal Regulations, as required by law, are usually not included. The documents within the Public Papers are arranged in chronological order. President Truman delivered the remarks or addresses from Washington, D. C., unless otherwise indicated. The White House in Washington issued statements, messages, and letters unless noted otherwise. (Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States, Harry S. Truman, 1945-1953. Washington, D.C.: United States Government Printing Office, 1966)

The Public Papers contain items such as the Statement by the President Announcing the Use of the A-Bomb at Hiroshima (August 6, 1945), the Special Message to the Congress on Greece and Turkey: The Truman Doctrine (March 12, 1947), the White House Statement Announcing Recognition of the Government of Israel (January 31, 1949), the Statement and Order by the President on Relieving General MacArthur of His Commands (April 11, 1951), and The President's Farewell Address to the American People (January 15, 1953).


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Provided courtesy of The American Presidency Project.  John Woolley and Gerhard Peters. University of California, Santa Barbara.
 86.  Remarks at the Raising of the Flag Over the U.S. Group Control Council Headquarters in Berlin
July 20, 1945

General Eisenhower, officers and men:

This is an historic occasion. We have conclusively proven that a free people can successfully look after the affairs of the
world.

We are here today to raise the flag of victory over the capital of our greatest adversary. In doing that, we must remember that in
raising that flag we are raising it in the name of the people of the United States, who are looking forward to a better world, a
peaceful world, a world in which all the people will have an opportunity to enjoy the good things of life, and not just a few at the
top.

Let us not forget that we are fighting for peace, and for the welfare of mankind. We are not fighting for conquest. There is not
one piece of territory, or one thing of a monetary nature that we want out of this war. We want peace and prosperity for the world
as a whole. We want to see the time come when we can do the things in peace that we have been able to do in war.

If we can put this tremendous machine of ours, which has made this victory possible, to work for peace we can look forward to
the greatest age in the history of mankind. That is what we propose to do.

NOTE: The President spoke shortly before 4 p.m. in the courtyard at the headquarters buildings. The flag used was the same one
that had flown over the Capitol in Washington when war was declared against Germany.