Harry S. Truman Presidential Library & Museum


THE KOREAN WAR

ARCHIVAL MATERIALS AT THE LIBRARY

Prepared by Dennis Bilger, March 2000

[ Truman Papers | Other Personal Papers |
Federal Records
| Oral Histories]

 

North Korean POWs


This material covers the historical background of the Korean War, including the division of Korea at the 38th Parallel between US and Soviet occupation forces; reparations reports involving Korea and economic surveys of Korea following World War II; the United Nations Korean Commission and Reconstruction Agency; Office of Strategic Srevices [OSS] reports on Korea; and relations with Republic of Korea (ROK) President Syngman Rhee.

This background material also includes the Wedemeyer Report on China and Korea in 1947. The material on the Korean War itself includes a chronology of events relating to the war in the papers of George M. Elsey; selected documents copied from State and Defense Department records relating to the Korean War; and materials from the files of the National Security Council [NSC] and the Psychological Strategy Board [PSB]. The Korean War material also includes information about General of the Army Douglas MacArthur and his dismissal as Supreme Commander Allied Powers; Commander in Chief, United Nations Command; Commander in Chief, Far East; and Commanding General, U.S Army, Far East.

[ Truman Papers | Other Personal Papers | Federal Records | Oral Histories]


HARRY S. TRUMAN PAPERS

PRESIDENT'S SECRETARY'S FILES-Approximately 5,000 pages of material in the following series, among others: the Korean War File (including documentation of the Wake Island Conference between President Truman and General MacArthur in 1950); the Intelligence File (including daily Korean summaries from the Central Intelligence Agency and situation reports on the war from U.S. Army Intelligence); the Subject File (including National Security Council reports on Korea, and information regarding prisoners of war); the General File (including documentation of the controversy leading to the dismissal of General MacArthur); the Frank E. Lowe File (including General Lowe's report on his mission to Korea in 1950-51); the Historical File (including speeches and press releases concerning the war); and the Diaries File (in particular, President Truman's 1951 diary entries on the dismissal of General MacArthur).

WHITE HOUSE CENTRAL FILES-Approximately 140,000 pages. Official Files 471-B and 584 are the largest files relating to the Korean War. OF 471-B relates to all aspects of the Korean War, including public opinion mail about the war; correspondence for and against President Truman's statement of June 27, 1950; correspondence relating to cease fire negotiations; prayers for peace in Korea; the burial of dead soldiers (including information on the burial of American Indian Sgt. John Rice at Arlington after he was denied burial at an all-white cemetery); and offers of service. OF 584 relates to General MacArthur and his dismissal, and includes expressions of support for General MacArthur's actions in Korea, and extensive public opinion correspondence favoring and opposing President Truman's action in relieving General MacArthur of his commands. In addition to OF 471-B and 584, other White House Central Files relating to the Korean War include OF 325 on war atrocities and war criminals); OF 426 on foreign relief for Korea; OF 85-EE on the United Nations Korean Commission; OF 85-YY on the United Nations Reconstruction Agency; OF 357 on medals awarded for service in the Korean War; OF 150-D on the Wedemeyer Mission to China and Korea; OF 2352 on genocide; OF 1392 on John J. Muccio, US Ambassador to South Korea; OF 1591 to 1591-B on civil defense; and OF 3000 to 3000E on the Office of Defense Mobilization. The White House Central Files also include the Confidential File, which has material on the Korean emergency in connection with the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), the Mutual Defense Assistance Program (MDAP) and the National Security Council (NSC). In addition, the President's Personal File contains reaction to President Truman's speeches on the Korean War (in PPF 200).

STAFF MEMBER AND OFFICE FILES-Approximately 18,400 pages. The largest relevant file in the Staff Member and Office Files is the Korean War File, which contains copies of State and Defense Department documents relating to the historical background, chronology, and military and diplomatic aspects of the Korean War. Also relevant are the files of the National Security Council (NSC) and the Psychological Strategy Board (PSB) relating to the Korean War, which deal with the Prisoner of War issue as well as Communist charges of biological and chemical warfare by US and UN forces in Korea. The office files of Clark M. Clifford, David D. Lloyd and Charles S. Murphy contain presidential speeches and speech drafts relating to the Korean War. The office files of Stephen Spingarn include the Legislative History of the Defense Production Act of 1950 (8 volumes).

President Truman and Cabinet Officials POST-PRESIDENTIAL PAPERS OF HARRY S. TRUMAN-Approximately 250 pages of material relating to the Korean War, mostly in the Memoirs File, which includes transcripts of interviews with Mr. Truman, Dean Acheson, and General Omar Bradley dealing with Korea, as well as information on General Douglas MacArthur. There is also pertinent information in the Secretary's Office File relating to the Wake Island Conference, filed under the name of Dean Rusk, and in the Manuscript File, in a study by Robert Bloom.

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OTHER PERSONAL PAPERS

DEAN ACHESON PAPERS - Approximately 1,500 pages relating to his service as Secretary of State, including memoranda of conversations, Princeton Seminars, a subject file on Korea, notes and memoranda relating to the Korean War, and a card file of notes on Korean War documents.

E. VERNICE ANDERSON PAPERS - Approximately 200 pages relating to President Truman's trip to Wake Island to conference with General MacArthur, and the Army-MacArthur hearings in 1951.

EBEN A. AYERS PAPERS - Approximately 200 pages including a chronology of the Korean War and a file on the Wake Island Conference with General MacArthur.

ROY BLOUGH PAPERS - Approximately 500 pages of material relating to the Korean War and his role as a member of the Council of Economic Advisors.

NILES W. BOND PAPERS - Approximately 70 pages of material relating to U.S. troop withdrawals from Korea prior to the onset of the Korean War.

JOHN D. CLARK PAPERS - Approximately 100 pages of material relating to the Korean War and his role as a member of the Council of Economic Advisors, particularly his letters and memoranda to the President.

CLARK M. CLIFFORD PAPERS - Approximately 50 pages relating to the U.S.-Soviet Conference on Korea in 1946, relating to the division of Korea at the 38th Parallel.

MATTHEW J. CONNELLY PAPERS - Approximately 50 pages of summary notes of Cabinet meetings relating to the Korean War and the dismissal of General MacArthur.

DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL COMMITTEE RECORDS - Approximately 150 pages of material in the DNC Library Clipping File on Korea and General MacArthur.

ROBERT DENNISION PAPERS - Approximately 50 pages relating to his service as Naval Aide to the President, consisting of formerly classified White House message traffic, 1950-52 and Daily Korean Summaries from the CIA.

L. LASZLO ECKER-RACZ PAPERS - Approximately 4,000 pages on tax programs, including volumes of reports and material relating to his role as Director of the Tax Advisory Staff, U.S. Department of the Treasury. These papers are useful in studying the financing of the Korean War and taxation for national defense during this period.

GEORGE M. ELSEY PAPERS - Approximately 4,600 pages of material relating to the Korean War, filed chronologically, including notes on the Blair House meetings of the President and the Secretaries of State, Defense and Treasury with the National Security Council (NSC) and the Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS). The papers also include teleconference notes of communications with General MacArthur and the JCS, and information on meetings with members of Congress to discuss the Korean War and the dismissal of General MacArthur.

KEN HECHLER PAPERS - Approximately 25 pages of notes to and from George M. Elsey relating to the Korean War.

EARL D. JOHNSON PAPERS - Approximately 2500 pages relating to his role as Assistant Secretary of the Army and Under Secretary of the Army, including newspaper clippings, news summaries, printed materials, correspondence and memorandums pertaining to the Korean War.

EDGAR A. J. JOHNSON PAPERS - Approximately 500 pages of material relating to his roles as Civil Administrator of the South Korean Interim Government, 1946-47; Chief Advisor to the Government of Korea, 1947-48; and Division Director, Korean Program, Economic Cooperation Administration (ECA), 1948-51.

LEON H. KEYSERLING PAPERS - Approximately 2,500 pages of material relating to the Korean War and his role as Chairman of the Council of Economic Advisors, including material on the Defense Production Act of 1950, Defense Mobilization Economics, 1951, and articles by Keyserling, including the following: "Economics of National Defense" December 1950; "Why We Can Have Butter and Guns," February 1951; "Production Strategy for Defense," radio address, April 15, 1951; "Economics of Defense Mobilization," April 18, 1951; Defense Economics-CEA Model," "The Role of Liberals in the Defense Program," address to ADA Conference, Washington, DC, May 18, 1951; and "The Impact of Rearmament on the United States," July 1952.

FRANCIS P. MATTHEWS PAPERS - Approximately 250 pages of material relating to his role as Secretary of the Navy, 1949-51 in connection with the Korean War, particularly his Far East trip in November 1950, and his appointments and daily logs for the Korean War period.

MISCELLANEOUS HISTORICAL DOCUMENTS COLLECTION - Approximately 19 pages of material relating to the Korean War, consisting of an historical study of the Korean and Vietnam Wars, in MHDC No. 244 (8 pages); and correspondence between Professor John Edward Wiltz and other scholars interested in the Korean War, in MHDC No. 325 (11 pages).

JOHN B. MOULLETTE PAPERS - Approximately 800 pages relating to Marine Corporal Moullette's January 16, 1951 letter to his father questioning the involvement of the United States in the Korean War. Moullette's father forwarded the letter to Secretary of State Dean Acheson who responded on February 23, 1951. This correspondence was subsequently published in many newspapers. The papers of John B. Moullette include the original correspondence, as well as public opinion letters and published materials sent to the Moullettes in response to this correspondence. Marine tank

FRANK PACE, JR. PAPERS - Approximately 500 pages relating to his role as Secretary of the Army, including scrapbooks and Korean and Chinese language leaflets.

JAMES T. QUIRK PAPERS - Approximately 200 pages of material relating to his role as an officer in the United States Army in charge of press relations for General Matthew B. Ridgway, before and after Ridgway replaced General MacArthur as Supreme Commander in Korea.

HAROLD STEIN PAPERS - Approximately 500 pages of material relating to studies for the 20th Century Fund on civil-military policies particularly studies by Walter Millis and Martin Lichtman.

Attorney General Howard McGrath, President Truman, and Secretary of Defense Louis Johnson

THEODORE TANNENWALD PAPERS - Approximately 150 pages of material concerning the MacArthur hearings in Congress following the dismissal of General MacArthur from his Far East Command in April 1951.

CHARLES W. THAYER PAPERS - Approximately 100 pages of material relating to U.S.-Soviet partition of Korea into the two occupation zones of North and South Korea along the 38th Parallel in 1946.

JAMES E. WEBB PAPERS - Approximately 150 pages of material relating to his service in the Department of State, including a letter to John W. Snyder from Webb, April 25, 1975, describing the first days of the Korean War, the briefing of President Truman by Dean Acheson and Louis Johnson enroute to Blair House on June 25, 1950, and the meeting that night at Blair House to discuss the North Korean invasion of South Korea and the U.S. response.

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FEDERAL RECORDS

RG 407: U.S. ARMY UNIT DIARIES, HISTORIES AND REPORTS - Approximately 35,000 pages of material relating to military aspects of the Korean War, including records of the 8th Army in Korea, war diaries and command reports from June 1950 to December 1950.

RG 333: G-3 OPERATIONS REPORTS FROM THE RECORDS OF THE UNITED NATIONS COMMAND (KOREA) - Approximately 13,600 pages of material, consisting of G-3 Reports Nos. 191 to 921, January 1, 1951 to December 31, 1952.

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ORAL HISTORIES

ACHILLES, THEODORE C. U.S. Vice Deputy, North Atlantic Council, London, 1950; Minister, U.S. Embassy in Paris, France 1952. Approximately 5 pages including discussion of the Korean War's impact on Western Europe

ANDERSON, VERNICE. Personal Assistant to Ambassador-at-Large Philip C. Jessup, 1949-53. Approximately 35 pages primarily discussing the Truman-MacArthur Wake Island Conference.

BANCROFT, HARDING F. U.S. Representative, U.N. Collective Measures Committee, 1950-53. Approximately 8 pages.

BARRETT, EDWARD W. Assistant Secretary of State for Public Affairs, 1950-52. Approximately 4 pages.

BATTLE, LUCIUS. Special Assistant to the Secretary State, 1949-53. Approximately 5 pages.

BELL, DAVID E. Administrative Assistant to the President, 1951-53. Approximately 19 pages including discussion of the issue of U.S. preparedness, the Truman-MacArthur Wake Island Conference, China's entry into the war, General Douglas MacArthur's dismissal, and George Elsey's departure from the White House.

BENDETSEN, KARL R. Assistant Secretary of the Army, 1950-52; Under Secretary of the Army, 1952. Approximately 26 pages including discussion of U.S. preparedness, the decision to cross the 38th parallel, Communist Chinese intervention and the possible use of the atomic bomb, Truman's leadership, and the role of General Douglas MacArthur.

Truman and MacArthur at Wake Island

BISSELL, RICHARD M., JR. Deputy Director and Executive Secretary, President's Committee on Foreign Aid (Harriman Committee), 1947-48; Assistant Administrator for Program, Economic Cooperation Administration, 1948-51; Acting Administrator, Economic Cooperation Administration, 1951. Approximately 3 pages including discussion of the war's impact on food and raw material prices and on price and export controls.

BLAISDELL, DONALD C. Special Assistant, Bureau of U.N. Affairs, Department of State, 1947-51; U.S. representative for International Organization Affairs, Geneva, Switzerland, 1951-53. Approximately 4 pages.

BOND, NILES W. Assistant Chief, Division of Northeast Asian Affairs, Department of State, 1947-49; First Secretary, Office of U.S. Embassy in Tokyo, 1952. Approximately 24 pages including discussion of the post-World War II U.S. military government in South Korea, U.S military withdrawal from South Korea, South Korea as a defense perimeter, the North Korean invasion of South Korea and U.S. intervention in the conflict, the creation of the United Nations military command in Korea, the Korean Military Advisory Group (KMAG) and the military equipment of South Korea.

BORING, FLOYD M. U.S. Secret Service agent assigned to the White House. Approximately 6 pages on the Truman-MacArthur Wake Island Conference.

BRANDT, RAYMOND P. Chief, Washington Bureau, St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 1934-61. Approximately 3 pages.

BRIGHTMAN, SAMUEL C. Associate director of publicity, Democratic National Committee, 1947-52; director of publicity, Democratic National Committee, 1952-57. Approximately 3 pages.

BROWN, BEN HILL. Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Congressional Relations, 1949-55. Approximately 3 pages primarily discussing U.S. intervention in Korea in 1950.

North Korean tank

BROWN, WINTHROP G. Acting Director1947-48, and Director, 1948-50, Office of International Trade Policy, Department of State; Director, Office of International Materials Policy, Department of State, 1950-52; Deputy to Minister for Economic Affairs, U.S. Embassy in London, United Kingdom, 1952-55. Approximately 2 pages.

BRUCE, DAVID K. E. Ambassador to France, 1949-52; Under Secretary of State, 1952-53. Approximately 3 pages.

BUNKER, COLONEL LAURENCE E. Chief aide to Gen. Douglas MacArthur, 1946-52. Approximately 44 pages covering primarily the relationship of President Truman and General Douglas MacArthur, including discussion of a possible reconciliation in the 1960s.

BURRUS, RUFUS B. Harry S. Truman's friend and attorney. Approximately 5 pages.

BUTTERWORTH, W. WALTON. Director for Far Eastern Affairs, Department of State, 1947-49; Assistant Secretary of State, 1949-50; Ambassador to Sweden, 1950-53. Approximately 2 pages.

BYROADE, HENRY. Military attaché to Gen. George C. Marshall on China Mission, 1946-47; Deputy Director and Director, Bureau of German Affairs, Department of State, 1949-52; Assistant Secretary of State for Near Eastern, South Asian and African Affairs, 1952-55. Approximately 2 pages on the war's impact on Western Europe.

CAIRNCROSS, SIR ALEXANDER. Economic adviser to the Board of Trade, United Kingdom, 1946-49; economic adviser, 1949-50 and director, Economic Division, 1950, Organization for European Economic Cooperation. Approximately 1 page on the war's impact on the Organization for European Economic Cooperation.

CHILES, JOHN H. Secretary, General Staff of the Far East Command, and Supreme Commander for the Powers, 1948-50; staff officer and combat officer, Korean War, 1950-51. Approximately 45 pages including impressions of leading U.S. military commanders, as well as family friend Harry Truman, experience with the Far East Command in Tokyo at the outbreak of the Korean conflict, and command of the 23rd Infantry Regiment, February to July, 1951.

CLAGUE, EWAN. Commissioner of Labor Statistics, Department of Labor, 1946-54. Approximately 17 pages primarily on the war's impact on the U.S. economy.

CLARKE, BRUCE C. U.S. Army officer, commander of racially integrated units including I Corps in Korea. Approximately 18 pages including discussion of I Corps, the "enclave" strategy, Ethiopian and Turkish troops in the Korean conflict, the South Korean army's treatment of enlisted men and the dismissal of General Douglas MacArthur.

CLIFFORD, CLARK M. Special Counsel to the President, 1946-50. Approximately 2 pages.

CLUBB, O. EDMUND. Consul general, Vladivostok, U.S.S.R., 1944-46, Shenyong Manchuria, 1946, Harbin, Manchuria, 1946, Changchun, Manchuria, 1946-47, and Beiping, China, 1947-50; Director, Office of Chinese Affairs, Department of State, 1950-51. Approximately 3 pages.

COHEN, EDGAR. Official, British Board of Trade, 1932-53. Approximately 3 pages on the war's impact on international trade.

CONNELLY, MATTHEW J. Appointments Secretary to the President, 1945-53. Approximately 19 pages including discussion of the North Korean invasion of South Korea and U.S. intervention; the performance of Defense Secretary Louis Johnson, General Douglas MacArthur, the Truman-MacArthur Wake Island Conference and MacArthur's subsequent dismissal.

DANIEL, MARGARET TRUMAN. Daughter of Harry S. Truman. Interview conducted by the National Park Service. Approximately 1 page.

DAWSON, DONALD S. Administrative Assistant to the President, 1947-53. Approximately 9 pages including discussion of President Truman's temperament during the period, arrangements for the Truman-MacArthur Wake Island Conference, and General Douglas MacArthur's ultimate dismissal.

DENNISON, ROBERT L. Naval Aide to the President, 1948-53. Approximately 15 pages including discussion of the entry of U.S. forces, General Douglas MacArthur, the Truman-MacArthur Wake Island Conference and MacArthur's ultimate dismissal.

Machine gun emplacement

DRAPER, WILLIAM H. Under Secretary of War, 1947; Under Secretary of the Army, 1947-49; U.S. Special Representative in Europe with the rank of Ambassador, 1952-53. Approximately 3 pages including discussion of the decision to enter the conflict and of U.S. military strategy.

EAKENS, ROBERT H. S. Assistant Chief, 1945-48 and Chief, 1948-50, Petroleum Division, Department of State; Chief, Petroleum Policy Staff, Department of State, 1950-54. Approximately 2 pages on the impact of the war on the U.S. oil industry.

EDWARDS, WILLIAM P.N. Counselor, in charge of British Information Service in Washington, DC, 1946-49. Approximately 1 page on Korea as a barrier to aggression.

ELSEY, GEORGE M. Administrative Assistant to the President, 1949-51; Assistant to the Director, Mutual Security Agency, 1951-53. Approximately 40 pages including discussion of speechwriting during the period, White House records assembled by Elsey documenting the conflict, General Douglas MacArthur, the Truman-MacArthur Wake Island Conference, MacArthur's subsequent dismissal and press coverage and leaks to the press following the dismissal.

EWING, OSCAR R. Administrator, Federal Security Agency, 1947-53. Approximately 4 pages.

FINLETTER, THOMAS K. Secretary of the Air Force, 1950-53. Approximately 28 pages including discussion of the initial Blair House meetings of June 25 and 26, 1950, and the U.S. decision to enter the conflict, the amphibious landing at Inchon, the decision to cross the 38th parallel and the dismissal of General Douglas MacArthur.

FOLLIARD, EDWARD T. White House correspondent, Washington Post, 1943-54. Approximately 10 pages including discussion of General Douglas MacArthur and the Truman-MacArthur Wake Island Conference.

FOX, JOSEPH A. White House correspondent, Washington, D.C. Evening Star, 1943-54. Approximately 4 pages.

FRANKS, LORD OLIVER. British Ambassador to the United States, 1948-52. Approximately 5 pages.

GILPATRIC, ROSWELL L. Assistant Secretary of the Air Force, 1951; Under Secretary of the Air Force, 1951-53. Approximately 2 pages.

GRAHAM, WALLACE H. White House physician, 1945-53; personal physician to Harry S. Truman, 1945-72. Approximately 7 pages primarily discussing the Truman-MacArthur Wake Island Conference.

GREENE, CHARLES J. Washington, D.C. correspondent, New York Daily News, 1946-69. Approximately 13 pages including discussion of General Douglas MacArthur and the Truman-MacArthur Wake Island Conference.

GRIFFITH, PAUL H. National commander, American Legion, 1946-47; Assistant Secretary of Defense, 1950. Approximately 8 pages.

HARDIN, PERRY R. Clerk in the White House file room, 1945-52. Approximately 1 page on the Truman-MacArthur Wake Island Conference.

HARKORT, GUNTHER. Representative of the Federal Republic of Germany to the Economic Administration. Approximately 7 pages on economic policies during the period.

HARRIMAN, W. AVERELL. Ambassador to Russia, 1943-46; Ambassador to Great Britain, 1946; Secretary Commerce, 1946-48; Special Representative in Europe, Economic Cooperation Administration, 1948-50; Director, Mutual Security Agency, 1951-53. Interview conducted by the Iroquois Research Institute. Approximately 4 pages primarily discussing General Douglas MacArthur, the Truman-MacArthur Wake Island Conference and MacArthur's subsequent dismissal.

HAYES, SAMUEL P. Chief, Special Economic and Technical Mission to Indonesia, 1951-52; Assistant Director for the Far East, Mutual Security Agency, 1952-53. . Approximately 5 pages including discussion of U.S. aid programs in Korea.

HECHLER, KEN. Special Assistant to the President, 1949-53. Approximately 5 pages including discussion of White House relations with Congress and tax policy during the period.

HERTFORD, KENNER F. Military adviser, U.N. Conference on International Organization, 1945; member, Inter-American Defense Board and Joint Brazil-U.S. Defense Commission, 1947. Approximately 4 pages.

HICKERSON, JOHN D. Assistant Secretary of State for U.N. Affairs, 1949-53. ; Approximately 34 pages including discussion of the U.S. response to the North Korean invasion, the Blair House meetings of June 25 and 26, 1950, U.S. efforts to gain and maintain United Nations support, the role of the Soviet Union in the Korean conflict, and the dismissal of General Douglas MacArthur.

Wounded soldiers at an aid station

HOFFMAN, PAUL G. Administrator, Economic Cooperation Administration, 1948-50. Approximately 2 pages.

HOLEMAN, FRANK. Washington, D.C. correspondent, New York Daily News, 1946-65. Approximately 17 pages including discussion of press coverage of the war, the initial combat phase, General Douglas MacArthur, the Truman-MacArthur Wake Island conference, Communist China's entry into the war and the U.S. response, the performance of West Point graduates in the war, and President Dwight Eisenhower and the war.

HULLEY, BENJAMIN M. Second Secretary and consul, U.S. Legation, Reykjavik, Iceland, 1944-45; First Secretary and consul, U.S. Legation, Helsinki, Finland, 1945-47; Chief, Division of Northern European Affairs, Department of State, 1947-51; First Secretary and consul, U.S. Embassy in London, United Kingdom, 1951-54. Approximately 2 pages.

JOHNSON, U. ALEXIS. Consul, Manila, Philippines, 1945; detailed to General Headquarters, Supreme Commander, Allied Powers, Tokyo, Japan, August 1945; consul, Yokohama, Japan, April 1946, consul general, 1947-49; Deputy Director, 1949-51, Director, 1951, Office of Northeast Asian Affairs, Department of State; Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Far Eastern Affairs, 1951-53. Approximately 40 pages including discussion of the outbreak of the Korean conflict, the institution of regular State Department meeting with the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the Truman-MacArthur Wake Island Conference, the question of crossing the 38th parallel, armistice negotiations, the question of repatriation for Communist prisoners of war (POWs) and Communist POW riots in Woji-do prison camp.

JUDD, WALTER H. Member of Congress from Minnesota, 1943-62. Also an interview conducted by the Former Members of Congress Oral History Project. Approximately 25 pages including discussion of the conflict's origin, the proposed use of Chinese Nationalist troops in Korea, the advisability of having a Congressional resolution supporting the President's action, General Douglas MacArthur's inspection trip to Taiwan, the possible use of the Atomic Bomb in the Korean conflict and the subsequent Truman-Attlee talks; the dismissal of General MacArthur, and the armistice negotiations.

KAISER, PHILIP M. Assistant Secretary of Labor for International Affairs, 1949-53. Approximately 1 page primarily on the decision to cross the 38th parallel.

KENNEY, W. JOHN. Under Secretary of the Navy, 1947-49; Chief of Mission, Economic Cooperation Administration, United Kingdom, 1949-50; Deputy Director, Mutual Security Agency, 1952. Approximately 5 pages primarily covering the war's impact on foreign aid.

KENT, CARLETON. Washington, D.C. correspondent, Chicago Daily Times and Chicago Sun-Times, 1945-71. Approximately 13 pages including discussion of the Truman-MacArthur Wake Island conference and General Douglas MacArthur's subsequent dismissal.

KEYSERLING, LEON H. Vice Chairman, 1946-50, and Chairman, 1950-53, Council of Economic Advisers. Approximately 24 pages on economic policy during the period.war.

LANDRY, ROBERT B. U.S. Army officer, 1932-63; Air Aide to President Truman, 1948-53. Also an interview conducted by the United States Air Force Oral History Program, 1983. Approximately 20 pages including discussion of the initial U.S. response to the North Korean invasion, General Douglas MacArthur, the Truman-MacArthur Wake Island conference and General MacArthur's subsequent dismissal.

LARKIN, FELIX E. Associate General Counsel, 1947-49, and General Counsel, 1950-51, Office of the Secretary of Defense. Approximately 36 pages including discussion of the performance and ultimate resignation of Defense Secretary Louis Johnson, General Douglas MacArthur, the Truman-MacArthur Wake Island conference, MacArthur's dismissal and the subsequent Congressional hearings at which Larkin served as counsel to George C. Marshall.

LARSON, JESS. Administrator, War Assets Administration, 1947-49; Administrator, General Services Administration, 1949-53. Approximately 2 pages on military procurement during the period.

LAUKHUFF, PERRY. Director, Office of German Political Affairs, Department of State, 1949-52; Special Assistant to the Director, Bureau of German Affairs, Department of State, 1952. Approximately 1 page on the war's impact on German rearmament.

LAWTON, FREDERICK J. Director, Bureau of the Budget, 1950-53. Approximately 3 pages on the war's impact on the Federal budget.

South Korean Infantry Officer

LEVA, MARX. Special Assistant and general counsel to the Secretary of Defense, 1947-49; Assistant Secretary Defense, 1949-51. Approximately 9 pages including discussion of the Korean invasion, the performance and ultimate resignation of Defense Secretary Louis Johnson, General Douglas MacArthur, the Truman-MacArthur Wake Island conference and MacArthur's subsequent dismissal.

LIGHTNER, E. ALLAN, JR. Foreign Service officer, 1930-70; Deputy Director, Office of Political Affairs, U.S. High Commission, Germany, 1949-51; Deputy Chief of Mission and counselor, U.S. Embassy in Seoul, Korea, 1951-53. Approximately 24 pages primarily covering Syngman Rhee and his declaration of martial law and arrest of members of the South Korean National Assembly in 1952.

LOEB, JAMES I. National director, Americans for Democratic Action, 1947-51. Approximately 3 pages including discussion of the Truman-MacArthur Wake Island conference.

LOVETT, ROBERT A. Under Secretary of State, 1947-49; Deputy Secretary of Defense, 1950-51; Secretary of Defense, 1951-53. Approximately 7 pages including discussion of post-World War II Korea and the war's relation to military aid in Europe.

MacDONALD, DONALD J. Naval officer; commander of the presidential yacht, USS Williamsburg, 1948-51. Approximately 1 page on the U.S. decision to enter the war.

McFALL, JACK K. Assistant Secretary of State for Congressional Relations, 1949-52. Approximately 3 pages including discussion of the initial White House meeting with Congressional leaders on June 27.

McGHEE, GEORGE C. Assistant Secretary of State for Near Eastern, South Asian and African Affairs, 1949-51; Ambassador to Turkey, 1951-53. Approximately 2 pages.

McGOWAN, CARL. Member of the staff of Governor Adlai E. Stevenson, 1949-53. Approximately 5 pages.

McNEIL, WILFRED J. Special Assistant to the Secretary of Defense, 1947-49; Assistant Secretary of Defense and Comptroller, Department of Defense, 1949-59. Approximately 21 pages including discussion of the initial U.S. response to the North Korean invasion, defense mobilization and budget matters and the dismissal of General Douglas MacArthur.

MAKINS, SIR ROGER M. (LORD SHERFIELD). Deputy Under Secretary of State, United Kingdom, 1948-52; Ambassador to the United States, 1952-56. Approximately 3 pages.

MANN, THOMAS C. Foreign Service officer, 1946-67; Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Inter-American Affairs, 1950-51. Approximately 3 pages.

MARJOLIN, ROBERT. Secretary General, Organization for European Economic Cooperation, France, 1948-55. Approximately 3 pages.

MARTIN, EDWIN McCAMMON. Director, Office of European Regional Affairs, 1949-52; Special Assistant to the Secretary of State for Mutual Security Affairs, 1952-53. Approximately 4 pages on Korean armistice negotiations.

MARTIN, EDWIN W. Consul, Taipei, Formosa, 1949-50; Second Secretary and consul, U.S. Embassy in Rangoon, Burma, 1950-51; staff member, 1952 and Deputy Director, 1953-54, Office of Chinese Affairs, Department of State. Approximately 4 pages.

MASON, EDWARD S. Member, President's Materials Policy Commission, 1951-52. Approximately 3 pages.

MATLOCK, CLIFFORD C. Political adviser, European Coordinating Committee, London, 1949-50; political officer, U.S. delegation, North Atlantic Council, London, 1949-50; political officer and Director, Plans and Policy Staff, Office of U.S. Special Representative in Europe, 1952-53. Approximately 5 pages.

MATTHEWS, H. FREEMAN. Deputy Under Secretary of State, 1950-53. Approximately 7 pages including discussion of relations between the State and Defense Departments, the amphibious landing at Inchon, General Douglas MacArthur, the Truman-MacArthur Wake Island conference and MacArthur's subsequent dismissal.

MELBY, JOHN F. Official, Office of Philippine and Southeast Asian Affairs, Department of State, 1949-52; Special Assistant to the Secretary of State for Mutual Security Affairs, 1952. Approximately 3 pages including discussion of Communist China's entry into the war and U.S. response.

MORISON, H. GRAHAM. Assistant Attorney General, Claims Division, 1948-50, and Assistant Attorney General, Antitrust Division, 1950-52, Department of Justice. Approximately 8 pages.

MUCCIO, JOHN H. Ambassador to Korea, 1949-52. Approximately 111 pages including discussion of post-World War II Korea, the initial North Korean invasion of South Korea, evacuation from Seoul of diplomatic personnel in 1950, the Korean Military Advisory Group (KMAG), the controversy over possible use of Nationalist Chinese troops, health conditions in the Korean conflict, the performance of Republic of Korea (ROK) troops, the Inchon landing; the decision to cross the 38th parallel, General Douglas MacArthur, the Truman-MacArthur Wake Island conference, Communist Chinese entry into the war, cease fire negotiations, prisoner of war (POW) camps in South Korea; South Korean President Syngman Rhee and possible alternatives to the Rhee government.

MURPHY, CHARLES S. Administrative Assistant to the President, 1947-50; Special Counsel to the President, 1950-53. Approximately 23 pages including discussion of U.S. intervention in the Korean conflict, General Douglas MacArthur, the Truman-MacArthur Wake Island conference and Chinese intervention in the conflict.

South Korean Infantry

NEWCOMB, ROBINSON. Economist, Council of Economic Advisers, 1947-50. Approximately 8 pages.

NITZE, PAUL H. Vice Chairman, U.S. Strategic Bombing Survey, 1944-46; Deputy Director, Office of International Trade Policy, Department of State, 1946; Deputy to the Assistant Secretary of State for Economic Affairs, 1948-49; Director, Policy Planning Staff, Department of State, 1950-53. 27 pages including discussion of the U.S. response to the North Korean invasion of South Korea, the decision to cross the 38th parallel, Communist China's entry into the war, the dismissal of General Douglas MacArthur, preparations for armistice negotiations and repatriation of Communist prisoners of war (POWs).

NIXON, ROBERT G. Washington, D.C. correspondent, International News Service, 1944-58. Approximately 99 pages including discussion of the North Korean invasion of South Korea, press problems in getting stories of the invasion, the participation of United Nations troops, General Douglas MacArthur, the Truman-MacArthur Wake Island conference, Communist China's entry into the war, the possible use of the atomic bomb, General MacArthur's dismissal and return to the U.S., the unpopularity of the Korean conflict and Dwight D. Eisenhower's campaign speech promising to go to Korea.

NOLTING, FREDERICK E., JR. Department of State official, 1946-63; Assistant to Deputy Under Secretary of State, 1950-53. Approximately 14 pages primarily discussing the war's impact on U.S. Asian policy.

OHLY, JOHN H. Deputy Director, Mutual Defense Assistance Program, Department of State, 1949-50; Assistant Director, Office of International Security Affairs, Department of State, 1951; Special Assistant for Mutual Security Affairs in the Office of the Secretary of State, 1951-52. 21 pages including discussion of the war's impact on U.S. Aid Programs and financing of the war.

PACE, FRANK, JR. Director, Bureau of the Budget, 1949-50; Secretary of the Army, 1950-53. Approximately 54 pages including discussion of the Korean Military Advisory Group (KMAG); the outbreak of the conflict and subsequent Blair House meetings of June 25 and 26, 1950; the decision to commit U.S. ground troops; the advisability of a Congressional resolution supporting the President's action; General Douglas MacArthur, MacArthur's inspection trip to Taiwan; the Truman-MacArthur Wake Island conference and General MacArthur's subsequent dismissal, including Pace's role in the General's notification; Communist China's entry into the war, and the U.S. response including the possible use of the atomic bomb; and the final armistice.

PERLMETER, IRVING. Assistant Press Secretary to the President, 1950-53. Approximately 3 pages including discussion of the Truman-MacArthur Wake Island Conference.

PLOWDEN, EDWIN NOEL. Chairman, Economic Planning Board, Great Britain, 1947-53. Approximately 6 pages.

RENFROW, LOUIS H. Assistant Military Aide to the President, 1947-49; Assistant to the Secretary of Defense, 1949-50; Deputy Director of Selective Service, 1950-57. Approximately 5 pages.

RICE, MRS. STUART A. Wife of Stuart A. Rice, Assistant Director for Statistical Standards, Bureau of the Budget, 1940-55. Approximately 10 pages on her family in Korea.

RIGDON, WILLIAM M. Assistant Naval Aide to the President, 1942-53. Approximately 2 pages on the Truman-MacArthur Wake Island Conference.

RINGLAND, ARTHUR. Executive Director, Advisory Committee on Volunteer Foreign Aid, 1946-52. Approximately 3 pages on American aid to Korea from voluntary organizations.

RINGWALT, ARTHUR R. Chief, Division of Chinese Affairs, Department of State, 1946-48; First Secretary, U.S. Embassy in London, United Kingdom, 1949-57. Approximately 4 pages.

SANDERS, WILLIAM. Special Assistant, Bureau of U.N. Affairs, Department of State, 1950-52. Approximately 8 pages.

SANDIFER, DURWARD V. Deputy Director, Office of U.N. Affairs, Department of State, 1947-49; Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for U.N. Affairs, 1949-54. Approximately 2 pages including discussion of the United Nations reaction to Korean intervention.

SCHNEIDER, J. THOMAS. Chairman, Personnel Policy Board, Department of Defense, 1950-51; Assistant Secretary of Commerce for International Affairs, 1952-53. Approximately 6 pages including discussion of the war's impact on manpower mobilization and Universal Military Training (UMT).

SHORT, MRS. JOSEPH H. Correspondence Secretary to the President, 1952-53. Approximately 3 pages.

24th Infantry Division troops

SMITH, R. BURR. Economist, Department of State, 1946-49; member, U.S. delegation, Far Eastern Commission, 1947-49; member, U.S. delegation, Austrian Treaty Conference, 1949; commercial attaché, U.S. Embassy in Bangkok, Thailand, 1950-53. Approximately 9 pages.

SNYDER, JOHN W. Secretary of the Treasury, 1946-53. Approximately 50 pages including discussion of the military status of Korea in 1949, initial steps taken in response to the North Korean invasion of South Korea, the financing of the war and the dismissal of General Douglas MacArthur.

SPINGARN, STEPHEN J. Administrative Assistant to the President, 1950; member, Federal Trade Commission, 1950-53. ; Approximately 8 pages on the Korean conflict including discussion of the U.S. decision to intervene and the Defense Mobilization Act of 1950.

STASSEN, HAROLD E. Member, U.S. delegation, U.N. Conference on International Organization, San Francisco, 1945. Approximately 7 pages.

STEELMAN, JOHN R. Assistant to the President, 1946-53. Approximately 3 pages including discussion of the role of the National Security Resources Board during wartime.

STOKES, ISAAC N. P. General counsel, Office of U.S. Representative in Europe, Economic Cooperation Administration, 1949-50; Special Assistant, 1950-51 and general counsel, 1952-53, Mutual Security Agency. Approximately 1 page discussing United Nations actions.

STOWE, DAVID H. Administrative Assistant to the President, 1949-53. Deputy to the Assistant to the President, 1947-49; Administrative Assistant to the President, 1949-53; aide to former President Truman during the 1960 presidential campaign. Approximately 6 pages.

STROUT, RICHARD L. Reporter, Washington, D.C. bureau, Christian Science Monitor, 1925-84. Approximately 2 pages.

STUART, HAROLD C. Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Civil Affairs, 1949-51. Interview conducted by the U.S. Air Force Systems Command. Approximately 8 pages including discussion of Air Guard and Air Force Reserve capabilities, bombing strategy and the decision to cross the 38th parallel.

SYMINGTON, STUART. Assistant Secretary of War for Air, 1946-47; Secretary of the Air Force, 1947-50; Chairman, National Security Resources Board, 1950-51; Administrator, Reconstruction Finance Corporation, 1951-52; U.S. Senator from Missouri, 1953-77. Approximately 2 pages.

TANNENWALD, THEODORE, JR. Counsel to the Special Assistant to the President, 1950-51; Assistant Director and Chief of Staff to the Director, Mutual Security Agency, 1951-53. Approximately 8 pages including discussion of General Douglas MacArthur's dismissal and the subsequent Congressional hearings.

TREZISE, PHILIP H. Office of Intelligence Research, Department of State, 1943-56. Approximately 1 page on United Nations participation in the war.

TROHAN, WALTER. Executive director, 1947-49, and chief, 1949-69, Washington, D.C. bureau of the Chicago Tribune. Approximately 8 pages including discussion of General Douglas MacArthur's dismissal.

THE TRUMAN WHITE HOUSE. Joint interview with Charles S. Murphy, Special Counsel to the President, 1950-53; Richard E. Neustadt, Special Assistant in the White House Office, 1950-53; David H. Stowe, Administrative Assistant to the President, 1949-53; and James E. Webb, Director of the Bureau of the Budget, 1946-49. Interview conducted by the National Academy of Public Administration. Approximately 7 pages including discussion of the U.S. decision to intervene following the North Korean invasion and the first Blair House meeting of June 25, 1950.

TUBBY, ROGER. Assistant Press Secretary to the President, 1950-52; Press Secretary to the President, 1952-53. Approximately 18 pages including discussion of Communist Chinese intervention, the dismissal of General Douglas MacArthur and Korean cease fire negotiations.

VAN DER BEUGEL, E.H. Director, Bureau for the Marshall Plan, Foreign Affairs Office, the Netherlands, 1947-52. Approximately 3 pages.

VAUGHAN, HARRY H. Military Aide to Harry S. Truman as Vice President, 1945, and as President, 1945-53. Interview conducted by the William Jewell College Oral History Project. Approximately 1 page discussing the Truman-MacArthur Wake Island conference.

WALSH, ROBERT K. Reporter, Washington, (D.C.) Evening Star, 1946-69. Approximately 2 pages.

WEIGLE, RICHARD D. Executive Officer, Office of Far Eastern Affairs, Department of State, 1946-49. Approximately 3 pages.

WERTS, LEO R. Director, Manpower Division, U.S. Military Government, Germany, 1945-49; Associate Director, Office of International Labor Affairs, Department of Labor, 1949-50; Deputy Executive Director, Defense Manpower Administration, 1950-53. Approximately 1 page on the war's impact on manpower mobilization.

Remains of a North Korean boxcar

WILSON, EVAN M. Assistant Chief, Division of Near Eastern Affairs, Department of State, 1946-47; Second Secretary and vice consul and First Secretary and consul, U.S. Embassy in Teheran, Iran, 1947-49. Approximately 3 pages on India's reaction to the Korean conflict.

WOOD, C. TYLER. Deputy U.S. Special Representative in Europe, 1950-52; Associate Deputy Director, Mutual Security Agency, 1952-53. Approximately 5 pages.

YOUNG, JOHN P. Chief, Division of International Finance, Department of State, 1943-65. Approximately 2 pages.

ZUCKERT, EUGENE. Member, Surplus Property Board, 1945-46; Special Assistant to the Assistant Secretary of War for Air, 1946-47; Assistant Secretary of the Air Force, 1947-52; member, Atomic Energy Commission, 1952-54. Approximately 6 pages.