Harry S. Truman Presidential Library & Museum

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Log of

The President’s

third visit to

Key West

Dec. 3 – 8, 1947


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C O N T E N T S

Roster of the President's Party Pages I to III.

Log of the Trip Pages 1 to 20.

The Everglades National Park Pages A-1 to A-3.

Log compiled by

Lieut-Commander William M. Rigdon, U.S.N.,

Office of the Naval Aide to the President .......


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ROSTER OF THE PRESIDENT'S PARTY

THE PRESIDENT

Fleet Admiral William D. Leahy, U.S.N.

Honorable J. Caskie Collet

Honorable John R. Steelman

Honorable Matthew J. Connelly

Honorable Charles G. Ross

Honorable Clark M. Clifford

Honorable Stanley M. Woodward

Major General Harry H. Vaughan, U.S.A.

Rear Admiral James H. Foskett, U.S.N.

Brigadier General Wallace H. Graham, U.S.A.F.

Staff

Commander Bruce Forsyth, U.S.P.H.S. White House Dental Officer

Lieut-Comdr. William M. Rigdon, U.S.N., Assistant to the Naval Aide

Lieut. Hoye D. Moore, (SC), U.S.N., Presidential Mess Officer,

U.S.S. WILLIAMSBURG

Mr. Dewey E. Long, White House Transportation Office

Mr. Russell J. McMullin, White House Transportation Office

Major George J. McNally, Signal Corps, U.S.A., White House Signal

Officer

Mr. Jack Romagna, Official Stenographer to the President.

Chief Pharmacist's Mate Preston C. Taylor, U.S.N.

Chief Steward Arthur S. Prettyman, U.S.N.

Chief Steward Jorge Santiago, U.S.N.

Chief Steward Irineo Esperancilla, U.S.N.

Chief Steward Vicente Manuel, U.S.N.

Chief Steward Gregorio Riolo, U.S.N.

Chief Cook Jose Palomaria, U.S.N.

Cook, first class, Domingo Olembario, U.S.N.

Cook, first class, Simeon Pollosco, U.S.N.

Photographer's Mate, first class, Donald W. MacAfee, U.S.N.

Steward's Mate, first class, Juanito Malapit, U.S.N.


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Secret Service

Mr. James J. Rowley, Supervising Agent, White House Secret Service

Detail

Mr. Howard S. Anderson, Assistant Supervising Agent, White House

Secret Service Detail

Mr. Henry J. Nicholson Mr. Gerald A. Behn

Mr. John A. Walters Mr. Stewart G. Stout, Jr.

Mr. Richard G. Kauffman Mr. John E. Campion

Mr. William F. Shields Mr. Frank G. Stoner

Mr. John T. Gorham Mr. Frank M. Barry

Mr. Emory P. Roberts Mr. Floyd M. Boring

Mr. Gerald B. McCann

President's Plane

Lt. Col. Henry T. Myers, U.S.A.F. Pilot

Major E. F. Smith, U.S.A.F. Co-pilot

Major T. Boselli, U.S.A.F. Navigator

Master Sergeant F. Willard, U.S.A.F. Engineer

Master Sergeant F. Winslow, U.S.A.F. Asst. Engineer

Master Sergeant C. Horton, U.S.A.F. Radio Operator

Staff Sergeant R. E. Hughes, U.S.A.F. Steward

U.S. Navy Plane

Lt-Comdr. T. W. Boyle, U.S.N.R. Pilot

Lieutenant C. C. Lovell, U.S.N.R. Co-pilot

Aviation Machinist's Mate, first class, N. R. Meed, U.S.N.

Aviation Radioman, first class, J. V. Shellock, U.S.N.

Newspaper Correspondents, Radio Correspondents and Photographers

Mr. Merriman Smith United Press Association

Mr. Ernest B. Vaccaro The Associated Press

Mr. Phillips J. Peck International News Service

Mr. Edward Folliard The Washington Post

Mr. Joseph H. Fox The Washington Star

Mr. Joseph Short The Baltimore Sun

Mr. Thomas Twitty The New York Herald Tribune

Mr. Charles Van Devander The New York Post

Mr. Charles J. Greene, Jr. The New York Daily News

Mr. Anthony H. Leviero The New York Times

Mr. Willard Edwards The Chicago Tribune

Mr. John R. Beal Time Magazine

Mr. James F. King The Kansas City Star


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Mr. Radford Mobley The Miami Herald

Mr. William Hillman Mutual Broadcasting System

Mr. Arthur Barriault National Broadcasting Company

Mr. John Adams Columbia Broadcasting System

Mr. Bryson Rash American Broadcasting Company

Mr. Keith Williams National Broadcasting Company (pool engineer)

Mr. John Rous Associated Press Photos

Mr. Frank Cancellare Acme Newspictures

Mr. Norton K. Benson International Newspictures

Mr. Henry L. Griffin Associated Press News Television

Mr. John Tondra Motion picture pool (camera)

Mr. John Martenson Motion picture pool (sound)

Mr. Jack Chambers Eastern Airlines Company

Mr. C. S. Linkins Western Union Telegraph Company


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LOG OF THE PRESIDENT'S THIRD VISIT TO KEY WEST

DECEMBER 3-8, 1947

Wednesday, 3 December:

The President departed from the Air Transport Command Terminal, Washington National Airport, by air at 8:14 a.m., for a brief vacation at Key West, Florida. He was accompanied by Fleet Admiral William D. Leahy, U.S.N., his Chief of Staff; Honorable J. Caskie Collet, Judge of the 8th District, United States Circuit Court of Appeals; Honorable John R. Steelman, Special Assistant to the President; Honorable Matthew J. Connelly, Secretary to the President; Honorable Charles G. Ross, Secretary to the President; Honorable Clark M. Clifford, Special Counsel to the President; Honorable Stanley Woodward, Chief of Protocol, State Department; Major General Harry H. Vaughan, U.S.A., Military Aide to the President; Rear Admiral James H. Foskett, U.S.N., Naval Aide to the President; and Brigadier General Wallace H. Graham, U.S.A.F., Personal Physician to the President, all members of his official party. The Honorable William D. Hassett, Secretary to the President, had also planned to accompany the President but was taken ill and had to remain in Washington. The trip was made in the "SACRED COW" (an A.T.O.C-54 type plane) piloted by Lieutenant Colonel Henry T. Myers, U.S.A.F., with Major E. F. Smith, U.S.A.F., as co-pilot and Major T. Boselli, U.S.A.F., as navigator. The "INDEPENDENCE" had been grounded, along with all other DC-6 type aircraft, for certain modifications to be made to improve its air safety, and was not available for this mission. Other passengers in the Presidential party were: Mr. James J. Rowley and Mr. Henry J. Nickolson of the White House Secret Service Detail and Chief Steward Arthur S. Prettyman, U.S.N., personal valet to the President. The "SACRED COW" landed at the Boca Chica Naval Airfield, Key West, Florida, at 1 p.m. The 1050-mile flight south was made at an average altitude of 7500 feet and was smooth and uneventful.

The President was met at Boca Chica by Mayor A. Maitland Adams of Key West; Mr. E. F. Trevor, the Acting City Manager; Chief of Police Joseph Kemp; Sheriff Berlin Sawyer (Monroe County); Captain Cecil C. Adell, U.S.N., Commander of the Naval Base at Key West and senior officer present; Captain Henry M. Cooper, U.S.N., Commanding Officer, Naval Air Station, Key West; Captain Willard A. Saunders, U.S.N., Commanding Officer, Submarine Base, Key West; Captain A. G. W. McFadden, U.S.N., Commanding Officer, Fleet Sonar School, Key West; Captain L. R. Daspit, U.S.N., Commander, Submarine Squadron Four

(based at Key West); Captain M. E. A. Gouin, U.S.N., Commanding Officer, Aircraft Squadron VCN-2 (based at Key West); Captain J. R. Ruhsenberger, U.S.N., Commander, Anti-Submarine Development Squadron One (based at Key West); Captain 0. A. Smith, Medical Corps, U.S.N., Commanding Officer, Naval Hospital, Key West; Mr. Howard S. Anderson of the White House Secret Service Detail; Mr. R. M. McDavid of the United States Secret Service (Miami office); Mr. Frank E. Jackson of the Office of Naval Intelligence (Miami office); Mr. Cecil Sewell of the Office of Naval Intelligence (Jacksonville office); Captain Tobe A. Bass, Superintendent,

Southern Division of the Florida State Highway Patrol; Lieutenant Commander William M. Rigdon, U.S.N., Assistant to the Naval Aide to the President; and the following named Washington newspaper and radio correspondents, photographers, White House staff and

additional secret service men who had arrived at Boca Chica at noon in a chartered four-motor, Eastern Airlines plane:


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Mr. Merriman Smith United Press Association

Mr. Ernest B. Vaccaro The Associated Press

Mr. Phillips J. Peck International News Service

Mr. Edward Folliard The Washington Post

Mr. Joseph Fox The Washington Star

Mr. Joseph Short The Baltimore Sun

Mr. Thomas Twitty The New York Herald Tribune

Mr. Charles Van Devander The New York Post

Mr. Charles J. Greene, Jr. The New York Daily News

Mr. Anthony H. Leviero The New York Times

Mr. Willard Edwards The Chicago Tribune

Mr. John R. Beal Time Magazine

Mr. James F. King The Kansas City Star

Mr. Radford Mobley The Miami Herald

Mr. William Hillman Mutual Broadcasting System

Mr. Arthur Barriault National Broadcasting Company

Mr. John Adams Columbia Broadcasting System

Mr. Bryson Rash American Broadcasting Company

Mr. Keith Williams National Broadcasting Company

(pool eng.)

Mr. John Rous Associated Press Photos

Mr. Frank Cancellare Acme Newspictures

Mr. Norton K. Benson International Newspictures

Mr. Henry L. Griffin Associated Press News Television

Mr. John Tondra Motion picture pool (camera)

Mr. John Martenson Motion picture pool (sound)

Mr. Jack Chambers Eastern Airlines

Commander Bruce Forsyth U.S.P.H.S., White House staff

Mr. Jack Romagna White House staff

Mr. Dewey E. Long White House staff

Major George J. McNally White House staff

Mr. Floyd M. Boring U. S. Secret Service

Mr. William F. Shields U. S. Secret Service

Mr. John E. Campion U. S. Secret Service

Mr. John J. Gorham U. S. Secret Service

Mr. Richard G. Kauffman U. S. Secret Service

Mr. Gerald B. McCann U. S. Secret Service

Mr. Gerald A. Behn U. S. Secret Service

Mr. Frank M. Barry U. S. Secret Service

Mr. Stewart G. Stout, Jr. U. S. Secret Service

Mr. Frank G. Stoner U. S. Secret Service

Mr. Emory P. Roberts U. S. Secret Service

Key West was still recovering from the effects of a freak storm which struck there November 28th without warning, and the weather was a subject not even the weather man would discuss. However, a slight drizzle which had fallen intermittently during the morning had passed by the


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time the "SACRED “COW" was sighted over Boca Chica and a bright sun and inviting warmth greeted the President and the members of his party as they alighted from their plane at 1:02 p.m. The temperature of 76 was a decided low for Key West for this time of the year but was a welcome change from the freezing weather they left behind in Washington.

The President greeted the Washington correspondents and talked to them briefly. He was then greeted by Captain W. A. Saunders, U.S.N., his host on former visits to Key West. Captain

Saunders introduced Mayor Adams, Captain Adell and the other senior officers on hand to the President. After a brief exchange of pleasantries, the President posed with Mayor Adams and Captain Adell for the photographers. The party then embarked in waiting automobiles for the drive to the Submarine Base. The President rode in a 1947 Cadillac sedan (two-door convertible, black), which Mr. John M. Spottswood (owner and manager of radio Station WKWF, Key West) had graciously placed at his disposal for the duration of his visit. Admiral Leahy and Captain Adell rode with the President. The motorcade departed Boca Chica at 1:05 p.m.

The eight and one-half mile drive to the Submarine Base was made in twenty-seven minutes, as the route had been cleared of all other traffic. The motorcade entered Key West on Roosevelt Boulevard, proceeded west on Division Street to Duval Street; north on Duval to Southard Street, west on Southard to the main gate of the Submarine Base. The route was spotted with groups of smiling citizens, including about 3000 school children who were out to welcome the President back to Key West for another vacation. On entering the city the President took a position atop the back of the rear seat so that he could better acknowledge the greetings of the populace.

As the President entered the Submarine Base, at 1:32 p.m., full military honors were accorded him. A Marine bugler sounded four flourishes and "To the Color", eight side boys snapped to hand salute, the Marine guard "presented arms" and a 21-gun salute was commenced by a shore battery. (There was no naval or military band present in the area.) Four hundred and fifty Navy enlisted men, clad in white uniforms and spaced at arms length, "manned the rail" along the route inside the Base from the main gate to the President's quarters. The President's flag was broken at the Naval Base Administration Building at 1:32 p.m.

Captain Carl A. Johnson, U.S.N., Executive Officer of the Submarine Base and other Base office were on hand at the main gate to greet the President when he arrived.

The Presidential party arrived at the Commandant's Quarters (Quarters A-B) on the Submarine Base at 1:35 p.m. These are the same quarters occupied by the President and his guests on their previous visits to Key West. The party quickly disembarked and entered the quarters, where they were greeted by Lieutenant Hoye D. Moore, Supply Corps, U.S.N. (Presidential Mess Officer of the WILLIAMSBURG), who had come down from Washington to supervise the President's Mess. Captain Adell and Captain Saunders paid their respects to the President and Admirals Leahy and Foskett, and then departed.

One of the President's first acts on arriving at his quarters was to report his safe arrival to Mrs. Truman. They talked over the direct Key West-Washington telephone hookup. The members of the party then retired to their respective quarters, where they changed to more comfortable clothing and proceeded to settle down.


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Lunch was served in the President's Mess at 2:10 p.m. There were no guests.

Shortly after lunch, the President, Admiral Leahy, Judge Collet, Mr. Connelly, Mr. Ross, Mr. Clifford, General Vaughan and General Graham returned to their respective rooms and took a long nap. Mr. Woodward, Mr. Steelman and Admiral Foskett moved out on the west lawn and sunned for more than an hour.

Dinner was at 7:30 p.m. There were no guests.

The members of the party spent a very quiet evening about the quarters. As the trip to Key West had been planned solely for rest and relaxation, the local officials had been asked specifically not to plan any official entertainment or receptions for the President.

The President occupied his usual rooms, the north second floor suite; Admiral Foskett and General Vaughan the north center bedroom; Mr. Ross and Mr. Clifford the south center bedroom; Mr. Connelly and Mr. Steelman the south bedroom; Mr. Woodward, the small bedroom on the second floor; and Admiral Leahy and Judge Collet the bedroom on the first floor. General Graham was berthed in a section of the east second-floor porch - adjacent to General Vaughan's room.

Members of the White House Staff, the Press and the Secret Service were quartered at the Submarine Base Bachelor Officers' Quarters (building #128). A press room was set up in the same building. The Staff, Press and Secret Service were subsisted at the Fleet Sonar School Officers' Mess, located directly across the street from the B.O.Q.

Lieutenant Colonel Myers, Mr. Rowley, Mr. McCann, Mr. Barry, Major McNally, Mr. Long and Captain Bass left Boca Chica in the "SACRED COW" shortly after the President had disembarked, for Naples, Florida, to check on the airfield facilities there and the security arrangements necessary incident to the President's forthcoming visit to Everglades, Florida. Lieutenant Colonel Myers returned to Boca Chica later in the afternoon but the others remained at Everglades.

Lieutenant Commander Rigdon and Lieutenant Moore had come to Key West on Monday, December 1st, to ready the Presidential Quarters and to set up the President's Mess. They brought with them eight Filipino cooks and stewards from the U.S.S. WILLIAMSBURG: Chief Stewards Santiago, Esperancilla, Manuel, Riolo; Chief Cook Palomaria; Cooks first class Olembario and Pollosco; and Steward's mate first class Malapit. Also in the advance party were Mr. Howard S. Anderson and John A. Walters of the White House Secret Service Detail, Chief Pharmacist's Mate Preston C. Taylor (U.S.S. WILLIAMSBURG) and Photographer's Mate first class Donald W. MacAfee (Naval Photographic Center, Anacostia, D. C.). The advance party was transported in a Navy plane (R-4-D), which was piloted by Lieutenant Commander T. W. Boyle, U.S.N.R.

Except for direct telephone wire service between the President's Quarters at Key West and the White House, no special communication facilities were installed at Key West incident to this


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visit. A continuous watch was stood on this telephone and its facilities proved entirely adequate to keep the President and the members of his party in quick touch with the White House.

Codes and publications necessary to handle highly classified communications were taken along but it was not necessary to employ them. The Submarine Base established direct RATT (radio teletype) service between Key West and the Navy Department but it was not necessary to use this system either. All telegrams sent while at Key West were transmitted over the Navy TWX system.

Thursday, 4 December:

The President arose at 7:30 a.m. and breakfasted with the members of his party at 7:45 a.m. After breakfast he retired to his suite where he read the morning papers and studied official documents that he had brought with him from Washington.

Mr. Ross left the Presidential quarters at 9:50 a.m. and walked to the BOQ (Bldg. 128), where he met with the correspondents. He returned to Quarters "A-B" at 10:20 a.m.

At 10:30 a.m. the President, accompanied by Mr. Steelman, Mr. Connelly, Mr. Ross, Mr. Clifford, Mr. Woodward, Admiral Foskett and Generals Vaughan and Graham left Quarters "A-B" and walked to the Enlisted Men's Beach at the Submarine Base. This is the same beach used by the Presidential party on previous visits to Key West. They were joined there later by Admiral Leahy and Judge Collet, who motored down. The weather was a bit cool for swimming (about 75°), but there was a bright sun, so all hands except Admiral Leahy and Judge Collet donned bathing trunks and sunned on the beach. Some exercised by tossing the medicine ball about for a while. The entire party left the beach at 11:40 a.m. and motored back to Quarters "A-B". The President was at the wheel of the car in which he rode.

The Secretary of agriculture (Honorable Clinton P. Anderson) called from Washington at 12:30 p.m. and talked to the President over the direct telephone wire.

Captain Adell and Commander Bruce Forsyth (U. S. Public Health Service) were guests of the President and his Mess at lunch (1 p.m.).

After lunch the President retired to his suite and took a nap. General Graham, Mr. Ross and Mr. Steelman moved to the west lawn where they sunned for an hour or more.

At 2 p.m., Admiral Leahy, Admiral Foskett, Mr. Connelly, Mr. Woodward, Commander Forsyth and Captain Saunders departed on a deep-sea fishing expedition. They used the Submarine Base "Dolphin", a crash boat fitted out as a fishing boat, They returned at 6 p.m.,

bearing an excellent catch. Admiral Leahy took top honors with his 25 pound barracuda. Admiral Foskett got a smaller barracuda, and a grouper; Mr. Woodward landed 3 barracuda; Commander Forsyth, 2 barracuda; and Mr. Connelly, 2 grouper.

Mr. Ross met with the correspondents at the BOQ at 4 p.m. to advise him of the President's plans for the proposed visit to Everglades, Florida, on Saturday next, December 6th.


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Colonel Myers, in the "SACRED COW", flew to Immokalee, Florida, and return this afternoon. The trip was made in order to investigate the possibility of using the airfield there in connection with transporting the President to Everglades on Saturday. It had been thought that by landing at this airport the auto traffic problem presented in moving the President to and from Everglades would be eased somewhat. However, after a careful survey of the entire problem it was decided to adhere to the original plan to use the Army Airfield at Naples.

Captain Saunders was a guest of the President and his Mess at dinner (7 p.m.).

After dinner, the party spent a quiet evening about the quarters.

Captain Saunders left the President's quarters at 10 p.m., to return to his quarters.

The President and most of the members of his party retired at 11:45 p.m.

Friday, 5 December:

The President arose at 7:20 a.m. and came downstairs to the south porch, where he read the morning papers. He had breakfast at 7:55 a.m. with the members of his Mess.

At 8:15 a.m., the President left his quarters and, accompanied by Lt. Comdr. Rigdon and two Secret Service agents, took a 30 minute walk about the north end of the Submarine Base. He visited and evidenced considerable interest in the activities carried on at the Coast Guard buoy upkeep station. He also visited the old Key West post office building (one of the oldest buildings in Key West) and a base warehouse building (Bldg. #1) of Civil War vintage.

At 10;25 a.m., the President, Admiral Leahy, Admiral Foskett, Mr. Steelman, Mr. Woodward and Mr. Ross left their quarters and proceeded by foot to the U.S.S. ex-U-2513, which was tied up at a nearby pier. They were joined enroute by Captain Adell and Captain Johnson. The President was accorded full honors on his arrival on board the U-2513. As he went aboard, at 10:30 a.m., his flag was hoisted in the U-2513 and simultaneously was lowered at the Base Administration Building.

On board the U-boat he was greeted by Lt. Cdr. J. B. Casler, U.S.N., the Commanding Officer, and Captain L. R. Daspit, U.S.N., the squadron commander (Comdesron Four). Shortly thereafter at a ceremony held on topside of the U-2513, the President was presented a bronze plaque fashioned from the U. S. Navy submarine emblem, and a scroll designating him as a "qualified submariner" and honorary Commanding Officer of the U-2513. The scroll read as follows:


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"ADMIRAL OF THE UNDERSEA NAVY

to all who shall see these presents

GREETINGS

Know ye, that reposing special Trust and Confidence in the Patriotism, Fidelity and Abilities of HARRY S. TRUMAN, he having demonstrated the required qualities of Leadership, Initiative and Knowledge of things subnautical, I have nominated and, by and with the advice and consent of the Supreme Staff, do appoint him a Qualified Submariner from the 21st day of November, 1946. He is therefore carefully and diligently to discharge the duties and responsibilities of a Qualified Submariner by doing and performing all manner of things thereto belonging.

And I do strictly charge and require all Officers, Seamen, Marines, Soldiers, Aviators, Politicians, Senators, Representatives, Bureaucrats and Landlubbers under his command to be

obedient to his orders and respectful of his opinions as a Qualified Submariner.

This Commission to continue in force during the pleasure of the Admiral of the Undersea Navy, the opinions and recommendations of the Congress to be contrary notwithstanding. Done at the Headquarters of the Undersea Navy at New London, Connecticut, in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and Forty Six, and the Second year of the TRUMAN administration.

By the Admiral

JAMES FIFE By authority vested in me, and by

Reg. No. ONE virtue of your having participated

in submerged operations, I do here-

by appoint you Honorary Commanding

Officer of the United States Sub-

marine

EX-U 2513

Signed James B. Casler

(Commanding Officer)

Lieutenant Commander, U.S. Navy"

The idea of the scroll and plaque was conceived by Captain F. W. Fenno, U.S.N., (Commanding Officer, Submarine Base, New London, Connecticut). Lt. Cdr. Cassler made the presentation as it was he who commanded the submarine (U-2513) in which the President made his qualifying dive in November 1946. The officers and enlisted men of the U-2513 presented the President a tie chain designed from the submariners emblem. The President accepted the gifts and made a brief acknowledgment. Following this ceremony, the President made presentation of medals which had been awarded to four officers of Subron Four:

Cdr. G. W. Street Gold Star in lieu Second DSM

Cdr. I. S. Hartman Gold Star in lieu Second DSM


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Cdr. G. H. Whiting Bronze Star Medal

Lt. G. W. Clark Bronze Star Medal

Then, in company with Lt. Cdr. Casler and Capt. Daspit, the President made an inspection of the ship and crew. He stopped to chat briefly with a number of the enlisted personnel about their war service.

The President and those accompanying him left the U-2513 at 10:45 a.m. His flag was lowered in the U-2513 and broken at the Submarine Base Administration Building. At the head of the pier, the President, Admiral Leahy, Admiral Foskett, Mr. Steelman, Mr. Ross and Mr. Woodward embarked in a waiting automobile and, with the President at the wheel, motored to the Enlisted Men's Beach. They found Mr. Clifford and Generals Vaughan and Graham waiting for them there. It was much warmer today, so everyone except Admiral Leahy and Mr. Ross donned bathing trunks and took a dip in the surf. Afterwards some of the party tossed the medicine ball around a bit. The President, Admiral Leahy, Mr. Steelman, Mr. Ross, Mr. Woodward and General Vaughan left the beach by motor at 11:50 a.m. to return to their quarters. Mr. Clifford, Admiral Foskett and General Graham stayed on at the beach for about an hour longer.

The Secretary of War (Honorable Kenneth C. Royall) talked to the President at 12:30 p.m. He called from Washington over the special telephone wire.

Lunch was at 1 p.m. There were no guests.

After lunch the President, Mr. Ross, Mr. Clifford, Mr. Woodward, Admiral Foskett, Generals Vaughan and Graham retired to their quarters for a nap. Admiral Leahy, Judge Collett, Mr. Steelman and Mr. Connelly left the quarters, by car, at 2 p.m. on a shopping tour of the Submarine Base ship's service and Key West shops. They returned at 5 p.m.

Mr. Paul Brown of Palatka, Florida, (personal friend of the President and former Democratic National Committeeman from Florida) called on the President at 3:45 p.m.

Admiral Leahy, Judge Collet, Admiral Foskett and Mr. Connelly left the house at 5:45 p.m. to attend a small reception held at the quarters of Captain Saunders.

Mr. Paul Brown and Lt. Col. Henry T. Myers, U.S.A.F. were dinner guests of the President and his Mess (7 p.m.).

At 10 p.m. most of the party assembled in the living room and listened to the broadcast of the Louis-Walcott fight for the World's heavyweight title. Through courtesy of Mr. John

M. Spottswood, owner and manager of Key West radio station WKWF, the broadcast was piped direct to the living room and the reception was perfect, once an operational difficulty was overcome.

Mr. George M. Elsey (Assistant to Mr. Clifford) arrived at the President's quarters at 10:45 p.m. bearing White House mail. He had been brought down in a Navy plane.


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Mr. Paul Brown left the President's quarters at 11:45 p.m., to return to his hotel in Key West.

The President retired shortly after midnight.

Saturday, 6 December:

The President arose at 7:15 a.m. and spent the next half hour at his desk, working on official mail that had arrived last evening. He had breakfast at 7:45 a.m. with the members of his party.

Lieutenant Commander Boyle (in a Navy R-4-D) departed Boca Chica at 8 a.m., for Naples with Mr. McMullin and other members of the advance party destined for Everglades, Florida.

At 8:50 a.m., the President, Admiral Leahy, Judge Collet, Mr. Steelman, Mr. Connelly, Mr. Ross, Mr. Woodward, General Vaughan, Admiral Foskett, General Graham, Mr. Brown, Captain Adell, Commander Forsyth, Lieutenant Commander Rigdon, Lieutenant Moore and Mr. Long left the President's quarters by motor car for Boca Chica. Admiral Leahy and Captain Adell rode with the President. As this was an informal move by the President, no honors, other than "present arms" by the Marine Guard at the main gate, were accorded the President as he left the Base. His flag remained flying at the Submarine Base during his absence.

The Presidential party arrived at the Naval Airfield, Boca Chica, at 9:15 a.m. They immediately disembarked and boarded the "SACRED COW". Captain Adell, Commander Forsyth, Lieutenant Commander Rigdon, Lieutenant Moore and Mr. Long embarked in the Press plane (E.A.L. chartered plane) for the flight to Naples. The President's plane departed Boca Chica at 9:22 a.m. Captains Cooper and Saunders were on hand at Boca Chica to see the President off. The Press plane cleared Boca Chica five minutes later, at 9:27 a.m.

The Press plane landed at Naples, Florida, at exactly 10 a.m.(at the inactivated U.S. Air Force Field). The President's plane arrived there at 10:10 a.m.

As the President left his plane at Naples he was met by a large delegation headed by Governor Millard F. Caldwell and Senators Claude Pepper and Spessard L. Holland. As the airfield was in an inactive status, no honors were rendered. Mr. Rowley, Mr. McCann, Mr. Barry, Captain Bass and Mr. McMullin were on hand at Naples to take care of our transportation to Everglades.

After an exchange of greetings, the motorcade was lined up, passengers embarked, and we departed from the Naples airfield at 10:30 a.m., for the 40-mile drive to Everglades, a village of

650 located in the southwest corner of the State of Florida, near the confluence of the Barron's River and Chokoloskee Bay. As all other traffic between Naples and Everglades had been stopped by the Florida State Highway Patrol, our drive down to Everglades was very easily accomplished.


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The Presidential party arrived at Everglades at 11:30 a.m. and proceeded direct to the Wiley Guest cottage, where the President was greeted by a committee of civic representatives and members of the Everglades National Park Commission. Following this, a delegation of Seminole Indians were presented to the President. Mr. Kenneth Marmon, Indian agent for all the Seminoles in Florida, introduced the Indians to the President. One of them, William McKinley Osceola, presented an Indian shirt to the President. The shirt, of an orange, yellow and black pattern (the colors of the Osceola family of the Big Cypress band of the Seminoles) had been hand-made by Chief Osceola's wife. It was said that the shirt had been made from 5000 small pieces of cloth. The President also received a shopping bag from Chief Ingram Billy, the medicine man of his band. The bag was made of palmetto leaf fiber with buckskin thread and handles of cypress. Chief Billy told the President that the bag had been made by his wife.

Also in the group of Indians were Mike and Cary Osceola, sons of Chief Osceola. Mike, who was educated at a Miami High school, interpreted for the group. The President posed with the Seminoles for several photographs and then retired to the Wiley cottage for a brief rest.

The Presidential party left the Wiley cottage at noon and walked along the Barron's River to the nearby Rod and Gun Club, where he was scheduled to have lunch with a group of some 64 other dignitaries who had assembled in Everglades to participate in the day's ceremonies by which the Everglades National Park was to be presented to the United States by the State of Florida. Enroute to the Club the President stopped at a sponge fishing boat, moored along the river wall, where he was presented a giant sponge by a group of surprised and happy Greek sponge fishermen.

The Presidential party (the President, Admiral Leahy, Judge Collett, Mr. Steelman, Mr. Ross, Mr. Connelly, Mr. Clifford, Mr. Woodward, General Vaughan, Admiral Foskett, General Graham, Captain Adell and Mr. Brown) arrived at the Rod and Gun Club at 12:05 p.m. Preceding the luncheon, about one hundred guests assembled in the lobby of the Club to shake hands with the President. In the receiving line were: Mr. August Burghard, Chairman of the Everglades National Park Commission; the President; Mrs. Barren Collier, widow of the founder of Collier County; Secretary of the Interior Julius A. Krug; Governor Caldwell; Mrs. Caldwell; Senator Ed Johnson of Colorado; Admiral Leahy, Senators Pepper and Holland; Mr. Newton B. Drury, Director of the National Park Service; and Representatives Joe Hendricks and George D. Smathers.

The luncheon, which was tendered by the Everglades National Park Commission, began at 12:30 p.m. The menu featured Florida fruit, and foods----Okaloacooche cup (polished cocoanut shell filled with crushed fruits), stone crabs with hot lemon butter sauce, Sarasota asparagus (Hollandaise), souffle of spinach, salad of pear hearts, meringue of Key lime pie, cake, and coffee. During the course of the luncheon the President was presented a leather-bound album containing a sheet of the 3-cent postage stamps issued to commemorate the dedication of the Everglades National Park. The album had been autographed by Postmaster General Donaldson and former Postmaster General Hannegan. The presentation was made by Mr. John D. Pennenkamp, a, member of the Park Commission, who served as master of ceremonies at the luncheon. The Club's dining room was paneled with stained pecky cypress and decked with stuffed samples of the 100-odd varieties of fish that are caught in the about Everglades. On the wall where the President sat was the largest tarpon ever caught in the Everglades (187 pounds).


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Other members of the party accompanying the President, including the Press, attended a fish fry held at the local airfield, near the scene of the dedication ceremonies. Their menu consisted of fried mullet, baked beans, cole slaw and hushpuppies, with cold drinks and hot coffee

The ceremonies at which the Everglades National park was formally transferred and dedicated were held at the Everglades airfield, located on the outskirts of the village, near Chokoloksee Bay. A crowd of approximately 5000, including 150 Seminoles (one-sixth of their entire Florida population), was in attendance. The newspapers had predicted that 20,000 persons would come to Everglades for the day. This undoubtedly frightened many would-be-visitors who feared they would get mired in a traffic jam as there is but one narrow road that leads into the village.

The dedication program began promptly at 2 p.m. The opening remarks were made by Mr. John D. Pennenkamp, who presided over the ceremonies. The President was not present at that time as he was not due to arrive until 2:30 p.m. The program followed in this order:

Invocation by Deaconess Harriet M. Bedell of the Glades Cross Mission. Deaconess Bedell has for many years been an Episcopal missionary to the Seminoles.

Selection, "Suwannee River", by the Fort Myers High School band.

Mr. August Burghard, Chairman of the Everglades National Park Commission, introduced Mr. Ernest F. Coe, originator of the park movement, and other distinguished guests.

National Park Director Newton B. Drury was presented a plaque commemorating Royal Palm State Park, now included in the new national park, by Mrs. L. J. McCaffrey and Mrs. W. S. Jennings, president and past president, respectively, of the Florida Federation of Women's clubs.

The President and the members of his party arrived at the airfield at this stage of the program (2:25 p.m.) Honors, "Hail to The Chief", were rendered by the Fort Myers High School

band as the President left his car on arrival and proceeded to the speaker's platform. As the program was running a few minutes ahead of schedule, the proceedings were halted until

2:30 p.m. The President chatted with those on the platform until it was time to resume. The brief break was necessitated by the fact that the ceremony was to be broadcast, beginning at 2:30 p.m. with the address of Senator Pepper.

The program (was resumed at 2:30 p.m. with an address by Senator Pepper. Then followed an address by Senator Holland.

Next on the program was the formal presentation of the park area to the nation by Governor Caldwell.

Secretary of the Interior Krug, representing the federal government, accepted the 454,000 acres that will constitute the Everglades National Park at the outset. Other land (800,000


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acres more to be given by the State of Florida) will be acquired later, and Everglades will rate third among Uncle Sam' s twenty-eight national parks, being exceeded only by Yellowstone and Mt. McKinley (in Alaska).

Following Secretary Krug's speech of acceptance, the President delivered a fifteen minute address, dedicating the park and stressing the need for the conservation of our national

resources. The President made a distinct hit with his audience when he told them that he now had a White House over at Key West.

To close the ceremonies, Wah Nese Red Rock (lyric soprano and full-blooded Alaskan Indian) sang the Star Spangled Banner to the accompaniment of the Fort Myers High School band. Wah Nese Red Rock (Mrs. Joseph A. O'Neill, wife of an Air Forces veteran) was dressed in a white buckskin costume.

The benediction was pronounced by the Reverend E. A. Finn, pastor of the Everglades Community Church.

The ceremony was over at 3:05 p.m., and the President and those who had accompanied him up from Key West, reembarked and left Everglades by motor car for the airfield at Naples.

The President was at the wheel of the convertible in which he rode.

The President and those in his immediate group had an uneventful trip back to Naples but such was not the case with the newspaper and radio correspondents and photographers. After

their bus had been loaded and was ready to move on to take its place in the motorcade, it was discovered that the bus did not have sufficient traction on the soft ground. So the bus was

partially unloaded and then moved onto the road, and reloaded. In the meantime the motorcade had departed and regular traffic had jammed the narrow road. So the Press bus had to maneuver

its way through the snarled traffic, as best it could, in an effort to catch up. Soon a patrol car of the Florida State Highway Patrol picked up the Press bus and started out to escort it on to Naples. A few miles north of Everglades a further delay was encountered by the "Gentlemen of the Prose" when one of the rear tires on the bus went flat. Eight additional patrol cars were hurriedly summoned to the scene and the bus passengers were transferred to these vehicles and whisked off to Naples at a gait of about 80 to 85 miles per hour. After an uncomfortable ride of approximately 30 miles, they regained contact with the Presidential motorcade and arrived at the Naples airfield in company at 4:05 p.m.

The President's plane departed Naples at 4:12 p.m. and arrived at Boca Chica at 4:47 p.m.

where it was met by Captains Cooper and Saunders. The Presidential party disembarked

there and proceeded by motor car to their quarters at the Submarine Base, where they arrived at 5:15 p.m. The Press plane departed Naples at 4:22 p.m., and landed at Boca Chica at 5 p.m.

Mr. Merriman Smith (United Press Correspondent for the White House) and his mother (Mrs. Rozier) called on Secretary Ross and the President at 6:45 p.m. They departed at 7:15 p.m.

Mr. Paul Brown, who accompanied the President on the trip to Everglades, left the President's quarters at 7:20 p.m., to return to his hotel in Key West.


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Dinner was at 7:20 p.m. There were no guests. Admiral Foskett, Mr. Clifford and Mr. Connelly attended a party held at the Casa Marina Hotel, Key West, and were not present for dinner.

Mrs. Truman telephoned the President at 9:15 p.m.

Judge Collet left the President’s quarters at 9:30 p.m., by motor, for the Naval Airfield at Boca Chica, where he enplaned for a flight to Sedalia, Missouri. He had been called home be-

cause of the critical illness of his father. He was accompanied to the airfield by Lieutenant Commander Rigdon. He departed Boca Chica at 10 p.m., in a Navy R-4-D piloted by Lieutenant Commander T. W. Boyle, U.S.N.R.

The President and the remaining members of his party spent a quiet evening in their quarters. They retired shortly after midnight.

Mr. Elsey returned to Washington. His plane departed Boca Chica this forenoon, shortly after the President left for Everglades City.

Sunday, 7 December:

The President arose at 7:30 a.m., and spent the next hour on the lower porch reading the morning newspapers. He had breakfast at 8:30 a.m., together with most of the members of his party.

The President, Mr. Steelman, Mr. Clifford, Mr. Woodward, General Vaughan, General Graham and Lieutenant Commander Rigdon left the President's Quarters at 9:20 a.m., and walked to the station chapel on the Submarine Base, where they attended religious services. The services were conducted by Lieutenant W. J. Davis, the Protestant chaplain for the Base. As he was leaving the chapel, upon conclusion of the services, the President shook hands with the Chaplain and expressed his appreciation for the excellent sermon. Captain Adell, who was also in attendance, accompanied the Presidential party on their way back to the quarters, where they arrived at 10:10 a.m. Captain Adell paid his respects and then departed.

At 10:30 a.m., the President, Mr. Steelman, Mr. Clifford, General Graham, Mr. Woodward, and General Vaughan left their quarters and motored to the Enlisted Men's beach, where they donned bathing trunks and spent the next hour sunning on the beach. Admiral Foskett joined them there at 11 a.m. Some members took a brief dip in the surf and others engaged in a game of tossing a medicine ball around. While so engaged, Dr. Steelman was slightly injured when the ball hit him in the back, just above the hips. The party returned to their quarters at 11:40 a.m. Mr. Steelman continued on to the Naval Hospital, Key West, where he was given emergency treatment for his injury and released to return to his quarters.

Lunch was at 2 p.m. There were no guests.

The party spent a quiet afternoon at their quarters.


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Lieutenant Commander T. S. Griggs, Medical Corps, U. S. Naval Reserve, of the Naval Hospital, Key West, called at 6 p.m. to treat Dr. Steelman's injury. He departed at 6:30 p.m.

Dinner was at 7:50 p.m. Lieutenant Commander Rigdon and Lieutenant Moore were dinner guests of the President and the Members of his Mess.

There was no special activity this evening; the party spent a very quiet evening at their quarters, retiring shortly after midnight.

Monday, 8 December:

The President arose at 7 a.m., but remained in his suite until 7:45 a.m., while working on papers that he had brought from Washington. He came downstairs at 7:45 a.m., and had breakfast at 8 a.m., together with most of the members of his party.

The President sent a telegram to Captain Edward Saunders (fishing guide on March visit) wishing him a speedy recovery. Captain Saunders was in a Key West hospital seriously ill.

At 9:55 a.m., the President accompanied by all members of his party and Captains Adell, Cooper, Saunders, McFadden, Daspit and Smith left the President's quarters in a motorcade for Boca Chica. Captains Adell, Cooper and Saunders rode in the car with the President. Full honors were accorded the President as he departed the Base and his flag was lowered at the Base Administration Building at 10 a.m., when he went out the main gate. The route through the city to Boca Chica was the reverse of that followed on arrival last Wednesday. There was a goodly crowd of Key Westers out along the streets to bid the President goodbye.

The motorcade arrived at Boca Chica at 10:20 a.m., and the President' flag was hoisted over the Administration Building. All hands disembarked at once. Goodbyes were said and the Washington passengers embarked in their respective planes. All members of the President's party accompanied him in the "SACRED COW". The President's plane departed Boca Chica at 10:28 a.m., at which time his flag was lowered there. His plane was followed, at 10:37 a.m., by the Eastern Air Lines chartered plane bearing the members of the Press and the White House staff. Lieutenant Moore, together with Taylor (CPhM), MacAfee (PhoM) and the eight Filipino messmen departed Boca Chica at 11:00 a.m. in the special Navy R-4-D (Lieutenant Commander Boyle, pilot).

The President's plane arrived at the A.T.C. Terminal, Washington National Airport, at 2:57 p.m., where he was met by a group of friends, including Secretary of Defense Forrestal, Attorney

General Clark and Secretary of Labor Schwellenbach. The President returned to the White House at 3:20 p.m.

The Press plane arrived at the A.T.C. Terminal, Washington National Airport, at 3:05 p.m. The special Navy plane arrived at the Naval Air Station, Anacostia, at 5:40 p.m. All passengers reported a rather bumpy trip up from Key West.


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The Everglades National Park

The Everglades National Park when rounded out to agreed boundaries by the National Park Service, will rate third in area among the 28 National Parks, being exceeded only by Yellowstone and Mt. McKinley, the latter in Alaska. It is located at the extreme southwestern tip of Florida, taking in the Gulf Coast from point about one mile north of the mouth of Lostman's River south to and including Cape Sable, then including Florida Bay with its numerous small keys and islands to a point west of Lower Matacumbe Key where it follows the line of the Intra Coastal Canal to and across Blackwater Sound to a point southwest of the Overseas Highway where that road leaves the mainland and strikes Key Largo. Here the boundary is rugged, running northwesterly and westerly to omit the fertile lands of the Redlands but taking in Royal Palm State Park, a 4,000 acre area deeded by the State of Florida to the Federation of Woman's Clubs and maintained by that organization with a small fund appropriated biennially by the Florida Legislature. The boundary line then runs north to the Tamiami Trail, which it strikes for a distance of approximately ten miles, thence south ten miles and west to the Gulf of Mexico.

The only existing paved road leading into the Park is the Ingraham Highway which branches off U. S. No. 1 at Florida City, passes through the Royal Palm State Park on Paradise Key and extends to Flamingo and Cape Sable. Other roads probably will be constructed by the National Park Service which now has jurisdiction over the development plans for the Park. An entrance from the northwest leading to Shark River is being considered, which will connect with water transportation through Whitewater and Coot Bays, intercepting the Ingraham Highway at Coot Bay Landing. Highway construction probably will be held to the minimum in order to leave the great bird rookeries undisturbed. For the benefit of visitors, these will be made available by small boats and footpaths. Fort Jefferson or Dry Tortugas, a National Monument, can be reached by plane or boat.

The primary appeal of Everglades Park is exotic. Its extremes in both animal and plant life are remarkable. Here are birds seldom seen elsewhere on the Continent. The majestic flamingos with their reddish plumes, the great roseate spoonbills and the snowy egrets are few in number because of the spoilation practiced in recent years, but their great beauty is high reward for the task of locating them. With the careful nurturing that will be given these species by the National Park Service and the Wildlife Conservation wardens, they should increase steadily.

People familiar with the Park area over a long period remember that about 1910 and 1911 Cape Sable was the home of more than a thousand full grown flamingos. They were wantonly

slaughtered until they finally disappeared. About 1940 one large male was seen there and for five successive springs he appeared alone. In 1946 he showed up with a mate but some heartless hunter shot him and the mate disappeared. One of the objectives of the National Park Service is to restore these colorful birds and the equally beautiful roseate spoonbills to this area.

Among the plentiful birdlife at present the herons offer great variety. Most popular of these with visitors is the white ibis. There are countless thousands of these large birds, white except for their black-tipped wings and orange beaks. Night and morning they literally fill the sky above their rookeries. Other herons seen in great number are the Ward, named for the late Charles Willis Ward who explored the Everglades for the Smithsonian Institution about the turn of the


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century; the "little blue" heron which is usually snow white and gathers in such numbers around shallow waters that the scene resembles a vast white leghorn chicken yard; and on down the heron line to the black-and-yellow-crowned night herons who do their foraging after dark. Also there are bitterns, grebes, ospreys, hawks, eagles, limkins, cranes, painted buntings, and at least half a hundred other birds, including turkey and migratory ducks and geese.

Land animals now making their home in the park are the Florida black bear, deer, panther, wildcat, raccoon, opossum, rabbit, squirrel and smaller field rodents. Two amphibian mammals, the manatee or sea cow, and the otter, and two amphibian reptiles, the alligator and the crocodile, intrigue the interest of all explorers, whether scientists or sightseers.

It is in the plant life of the Everglades Park area that the greatest extremes exist and these are amazing to all types of visitors. Probably the most interesting plant feature is the growth of orchids and other epiphytes. There are orchids so minute that their well formed blossoms are no larger than the head of a pin while others have a glorious wealth of blooms on stems four,

six and even eight feet in length. Eighty-four varieties of orchids have been classified in this area, twenty-five epiphytic, fifty terrestrial and nine humus.

Vines grow to almost unbelievable stature. The strangling fig, starting as a tiny shoot on the bark of a large cabbage palm, attains proportions that envelop the tree and finally kill it – by

strangulation. Another enveloping growth but one that does not kill the tree is the shoestring fern which completely hides the trunks of some trees with its pendant leaves, each no larger around than a shoestring but several feet in length. Another plant called Blodgett's potato shrub, which grows a foot or so in height elsewhere, in parts of the Everglades area reaches a height of ten to twelve feet.

Most majestic of all plants in the area are the towering royal palms reaching heights up to 100 feet or more. These and the coconut palms which grow along the coast are the most admired of the palm family but there are dozens of varieties, each with its own particular appeal. Near the mouth of Shark River is a mangrove forest, the only forest of its kind in the world, reaching sixty to eighty feet in height and seeming to be impenetrable but actually so spaced that small boats can go through the water avenues for miles, the tops of the trees forming an arch over every water lane.

Every hammock in the Everglades has its own peculiar attraction for the nature lover. The vast expanses of marsh and stunted cypress, with thousands of acres of sawgrass and reeds, interspersed with land and water plants that in their season show millions of bright blossoms, sometimes seaming to carpet square miles of the flat glades prairie, all add their lure and intrigue the interest of the explorer.

Here the sportsman may fish to his heart's content and the variety of his catch is almost unlimited. But he cannot shoot. Hunting in the Park area is over. There are some of the rarest shells to be found along the beach at Cape Sable and in the forests are beautifully colored tree snails, some of them said to be found nowhere else in the world. Throughout the area are traces of the Seminole Indian occupation. The Seminoles have been given another reservation north of the Park but it is probable that the National Park Service will arrange to use some of them as


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guides when the development of the Park has progressed sufficiently to extend an invitation to the people of the United States to come and see this newest addition to the family.


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