Harry S. Truman Presidential Library & Museum

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LOG OF THE

PRESIDENT'S VACATION

CRUISE

(August 16, 1946 to September 2, 1946)

Compiled by

Chief Yeoman Charles J. Langello, U.S.N.

Edited by

Lieut. Commander William M. Rigdon, U.S.N.

and

Captain James H. Foskett, U.S.N.


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LIST OF THE PRESIDENT'S PARTY

THE PRESIDENT.

Honorable Charles G. Ross, the President's Press Secretary.

Honorable Clark M. Clifford, the President's Special Counsel.

Honorable George E. Allen, Director, Reconstruction Finance Corporation.

Major General Harry R. Vaughan, U.S.A., the President's Military Aide.

Captain James H. Foskett, U.S.N., the President's Naval Aide.

Colonel Wallace H. Graham, the President's Personal Physician.

Mr. Theodore Marks, Staff Field Representative, Veterans Employment Service.

Honorable John W. Snyder, Secretary of the Treasury (Washington, D.C., to Quonset Point, Rhode Island) - (Bermuda to Washington, D.C.)

Honorable Matthew J. Connelly, the President's Appointment Secretary (Washington, D.C., to Quonset Point, Rhode Island)

Honorable Robert E. Hannegan, the Postmaster General (Hampton Roads, Virginia, to Washington, D.C.)

Honorable John R. Steelman, Reconversion Director (Hampton Roads, Virginia, to Washington, D.C.)

Honorable William D. Bassett, Secretary to the President (Hampton Roads, Virginia, to Washington, D.C.)

STAFF: (Embarked in U.S.S. WILLIAMSBURG)

Garland L. Nowlan, chief electrician's mate, the President's Movie Operator.

Charles J. Langello, chief yeoman, Secretary for the Presidential Party.

Claude C. Brown, chief aerographer's mate, Navy aerographer.

Arthur S. Prettyman, chief steward, the President's Personal Valet.

Martin W. Steinberg, photographer's mate first class, Navy photographer.

Edward W. Kahlehoff, musician first class, Navy musician.

SECRET SERVICE: (Embarked in U.S.S. WILLIAMSBURG)

Mr. J. R. Rowley

Mr. J. F. Blackistone

Mr. G. McCann

Mr. W. Urick

Mr. A. J. Daigle

Mr. E. W. Moore


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(At Quonset Point, Rhode Island)

Mr. H. S. Anderson

Mr. R. Kellerman

Mr. F. Barry

Mr. A. Boyd

Mr. F. Boring

Mr. E. Lawrence

Mr. F. McDermott

Mr. T. Qualters

(At Bermuda)

Mr. H. S. Anderson

Mr. R. Kellerman

Mr. F. Barry

Mr. A. Boyd

Mr. F. Boring

PRESS, RADIO AND PHOTOGRAPHERS' POOL (All embarked in U.S.S. WEISS)

Newspapermen

Wire Services.

Ernest B. Vaccaro Associated Press

Robert G. Nixon International News Service

Ray Lahr United Press

Eugene Davis Transradio

Specials:

Felix Belair New York Times

James E. Warner New York Herald-Tribune

Jack Doherty New York Daily News

Joseph A. Fox Washington Star

Edward T. Folliard Washington Post

Joseph H. Short Baltimore Sun

Joseph Hearst Chicago Tribune

Windsor Booth Time

Cecil Dickson Gannett Newspapers

John Harris Boston Globe

Don Williams Providence Journal & Bulletin


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Radio:

Arthur Barriault National Broadcasting Company

Bill Coyle American Broadcasting System

John Adams Columbia Broadcasting System

William Hillman Mutual Broadcasting System

Photographers:

Stills

Johnny Thompson Acme Newspictures

Byron Rollins Associated Press Photos

Norton Benson International News Photos

Newsreel Pool

Al Mingalone Paramount News


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ITINERARY

Arrived Departed

Washington, D.C. August 16, 1946

August 18, 1946 Quonset Point, R.I. August 20, 1946

August 22, 1946 Hamilton, Bermuda August 30, 1946

September 1, 1946 Hampton Roads, Virginia September 1, 1946

September 2, 1946 Washington, D.C.


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LOG OF THE PRESIDENT'S VACATION CRUISE

Friday, August 16th:

The President, accompanied by his guests - the Honorable John W. Snyder, Honorable Charles G. Ross, Honorable Matthew J. Connelly, Honorable Clark M. Clifford, Major General Harry H. Vaughan, Honorable George E. Allen, Colonel Wallace H. Graham, Mr. Theodore Marks, and Captain James H. Foskett - departed from the White House at 1400, by motor car, for the Naval Gun Factory. They arrived there at 1415 and boarded the Presidential Yacht U.S.S. WILLIAMSBURG at Pier 1 for the start of their eighteen-day vacation cruise. Rear Admiral G. B. Davis, U.S.N., Commandant, Potomac River Naval Command, and Rear Admiral T. D. Ruddock, U.S.N., Superintendent of the Naval Gun Factory, were on hand to see them off.

On going aboard, the President and his party retired to the quarterdeck, where they posed for still and motion pictures.

At 1437, at the President's direction, the WILLIAMSBURG (Captain Charles L. Freeman, U.S.N., commanding) got underway on the first leg of the cruise. Captain H. E. Slye, Potomac River pilot, was aboard the WILLIAMSBURG. Captain Slye is the brother of Lieutenant W. C. Slye, First Lieutenant of the WILLIAMSBURG.

Our first scheduled stop was Quonset Point, Rhode Island. Various courses and speeds were used on our passage down the Potomac so as to conform to the marked channel. Drizzling rains which prevailed as we left Washington continued intermittently throughout the afternoon.

The U.S.S. WEISS (APD l35, Lieutenant Commander Charles E. Nelson, U.S.N., commanding) got underway shortly after the WILLIAMSBURG, joined up, and took station 1000 yards astern. The WEISS had been assigned to serve as escort for the WILLIAMSBURG for the cruise. Twenty-three members of the Press were embarked in the WEISS so as to cover the President's activities. Special facilities (radio teletype equipment) had been installed in the WEISS by the Navy for the transmission of press material filed by the newspapermen. Although not in personal contact with the President, they were briefed each day by Mr. Ross, using the facilities of the ship's radio telephone.

The President's day cruiser "Dol - lar", which had departed yesterday forenoon for the Narragansett Bay Area, developed mechanical trouble (excessive vibration of port propeller) and was directed to return to Washington. She had reached a position just off the Delaware Capes. She had returned to her berth by Sunday forenoon.

At 1610, traditional honor to the first President, George Washington, were paid as the two vessels passed Mount Vernon. The crew were called to quarters, the ship's bell tolled, the colors half-masted, and taps sounded.

During the early evening, the rain ceased, although there was still a light haze. The weather thereafter was pleasantly cool.


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At 1930, the President and his party attended movies on the fantail. The film "Monsieur Beaucaire", a comedy starring Bob Hope and Joan Caulfield, was enjoyed by all.

Saturday, August 17th:

At 0002, the WILLIAMSBURG and the WEISS left the Potomac River and entered the Chesapeake Bay, setting course for the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal at the head of the bay.

At 0550, the group passed Baltimore Channel. No one was stirring this early.

At 0730, the President appeared and took a brisk jaunt about the decks. He was joined by General Vaughan.

The two vessels entered the approaches to the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal at 0900. At 1037, when off Chesapeake City, Maryland, the WILLIAMSBURG lay to while the Canal pilot, Mr. Daniel D. Dunlap, was received aboard. Captain Slye, the Potomac River pilot, left us here.

About this time the President and his party donned bathing suits, to enjoy the sun on the flying bridge. The President waved at various groups assembled on the shore, and greeted ships as they passed us on our way through the Canal. On leaving the flying bridge, he stopped by the navigating bridge to greet the pilot. Mr. Dunlap, although only 40 years of age, is the senior pilot of the Pilot Association, Bay and River Delaware, having piloted in these waters since 1929, without mishap. The ships piloted by him include some of our largest battleships, though he told us he considered taking the President through the channel one of the greatest privileges of his career.

At 1214, we left the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal at Reedy Island, and proceeded down the Delaware River toward the Delaware Bay.

At 1640, the WILLIAMSBURG and the WEISS entered the harbor of refuge inside Cape Henlopen, and dropped anchor in order that the party might enjoy a short swim in the cool salt water. The WEISS anchored about 1000 yards abeam of the WILLIAMSBURG.

At 1650, the pilot boat DELAWARE stood in and picked up Mr. Dunlap, the pilot.

The ship's motor whaleboat, in charge of Lieutenant Slye, was lowered away, and lay to off the port gangway for emergency use. A rubber lifeboat was also lowered.

At 1700, the President, Mr. Clifford, Colonel Graham, and Captain Foskett went swimming from the port gangway. At 1710, the swimming party, completely refreshed, returned aboard.

At 1733, the WILLIAMSBURG and WEISS got underway, and stood out to sea. After passing Cape Henlopen, course was set for Five-Fathom Bank Light Vessel, and thence for Montauk Point on the easterly tip of Long Island.


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The sea was smooth, with gentle swells. The group proceeded at a speed of 13 knots, with only a slightly perceptible roll. The weather was cool enough so that the President and all the members of his party had a refreshing night's sleep and enjoyed themselves to such an extent that at 10 o'clock the following morning some were still arriving for breakfast.

Sunday, August 18th:

At 0000, the ships of our group set clocks ahead one hour to conform to Eastern Daylight Saving Time.

The President received an invitation to attend divine worship in the Central Baptist Church at Jamestown, Rhode Island, which he had regretfully to decline, as we were not due at Quonset until 1600.

At 1040, Montauk Light was sighted about 11,000 yards distant, and at 1103, abeam to port, distant 3.4 miles.

At 1300 we passed Sandy Point Light abeam, and at 1358, we passed Point Judith Light abeam to port, distant 1.8 miles.

At 1435, the WILLIAMSBURG hove to off Brenton Reef Lightship to pick up a pilot, Lieutenant Commander A. L. Hemma1in, U.S.C.G.

The detachment then headed through the West Passage and under the Jamestown Bridge at a 9-knot speed. As we passed along, the President was greeted with waves and cheers from groups assembled on shore and on the high center span of the Saunderstown-Jamestown Bridge. A number of small pleasure craft in the area followed the ship.

At 1605, the WILLIAMSBURG was moored starboard side to, to Pier 1, Naval Air Station, Quonset Point, Rhode Island, across from the aircraft carrier PHILIPPINE SEA. The WEISS tied up just astern. No other men-of-war were present.

Secret Service agents Anderson, Kellerman, Barry, Boyd, Boring, Lawrence, McDermott, and Qua1ters were awaiting us on our arrival at Quonset.

The crews of ships present were at quarters and rendered passing honors. No other honors were exchanged, as the President had expressly directed that honors by U.S. naval ships encountered during our cruise be limited to "attention" and salute by personnel on deck. The U.S.S. MISSOURI was named as the only exception to this rule and she was given permission to fire a Presidential gun salute had she been encountered.

At 1620, Rear Admiral Morton L. Deyo, U.S.N., Commandant, First Naval District; Rear Admiral E. L. Gunther, U.S.N., Commanding Fleet Air Activities, Quonset; Commodore George Seitz, U.S.N., Commanding Naval Air Bases, First Naval District; and Captain 0. E. Weller, U.S.N., Commanding the Naval Air Station, Quonset, came on board to pay official calls.


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Ensign Terrell F. Becker, U.S.N.R., White House courier, reported on board with mail from Washington.

At 1630, the Honorable James V. Forrestal, Secretary of the Navy, came on board to pay his respects to the President. Secretary Forrestal was visiting at his summer home in Newport, Rhode Island.

At 1700, the President met with a group of reporters and photographers at the gangway, and held a brief press conference.

At 1716, Secretary Forrestal left the ship.

At 1739, the President and his embarked guests left the ship to attend a supper party, as guests of his Naval Aide and Mrs. Foskett, at the home of Mrs. Foskett's mother, Mrs. John K. Kane, at Plum Beach, Saunderstown, Rhode Island.

On departing, the President himself took the wheel of his Mercury cabriolet, and with the top down, drove off in the lead of a 5-car cavalcade to Saunderstown.

In addition to the President and his party, the guests of Captain and Mrs. Foskett (mostly near relatives) included Mrs. John K. Kane (Mrs. Foskett's mother), Mr. and Mrs. Walter Larzelere, Mr. and Mrs. Braden B. Kane, Mr. and Mrs. James Donnelly, Rear Admiral and Mrs. E. L. Gunther, Captain and Mrs. Oscar E. Weller, Misses Margaret Foskett, Mary Paul Foskett, Nancy Kane, Kitty Kane, Peggy Ann Montgomery, and Masters Jackie and Peter Kane.

At 2105, the President and his party returned to the ship.

Monday, August 19th: - At Quonset Point, Rhode Island.

0657, the President, accompanied by his Naval Aide, left the ship for a brisk walk about the air station. They were joined ashore by Captain Oscar E. Weller, U.S.N., commanding officer of the Naval Air Station, Quonset. It set in raining shortly after their return, and continued to rain intermittently throughout the day.

At 0727, the President and his Naval Aide returned to the ship.

At 0918, Mr. Edward H. Foley, Assistant Secretary of the Treasury, came aboard to call on the President.

At 0950, the President talked with Mrs. Truman in Independence, Missouri, over the long distance telephone.


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At 1007, Mr. J. Howard McGrath, Solicitor General of the United States and the Honorable John Pastore, Governor of Rhode Island, came aboard to call on the President. They were accompanied by children of friends, for whom the President signed autographs.

At 1030, Ensign Becker left the ship with mail for the White House. He was returned to Washington by air.

At 1035, the President, accompanied by the Solicitor General, the Governor, his Military and Naval Aides and Mr. Matthew Connelly, embarked in a Navy high speed aircraft rescue boat for the Naval War College at Newport, Rhode Island.

At Newport, the President was met at the boat landing at the Naval Training Station by the President of the Naval War College, Admiral Raymond A. Spruance, and his Chief of Staff, Rear Admiral Allan E. Smith. Also present were the Commander Naval Bases, Newport, Commodore Paul Theiss, and the Commanding Officer of the Naval Training Station, Captain Charles F. Grisham.

Admiral Spruance, the host, conducted the President to the Naval War College, where he was taken on an unofficial inspection of that institution. The President found the War College class assembled in the auditorium, and made a brief extemporaneous address. He then left the War College and hurriedly looked over the General Line School located in the adjacent Naval Training Station. He walked through several of the classrooms, pausing a few minutes before one class to make a a few remarks.

The party proceeded to the "President's House" for a stag luncheon. Mrs. Spruance welcomed the President here and then retired from the gathering. Admiral Spruance's guests included, in addition to the President and his party, Rear Admiral Allan E. Smith, Commodore Penn L. Carroll, Commodore Paul Theiss, and Mr. Gilbert H. Wildeman.

Upon completion of the luncheon the President and his party were driven to the boat landing and at 1330 took their leave of Admiral Spruance, embarking in the aircraft rescue boat. They arrived aboard ship at 1400. At 1405, Governor Pastore, Mr. McGrath, Mr. Snyder, and Mr. Foley left the ship. Secretary Snyder returned to Washington at this time.

At 1740, Mr. Connelly took leave of the President and his party and left the ship for his home in Clinton, Massachusetts.

Tuesday, August 20th: At Quonset Point, Rhode Island.

At 0622, the President, accompanied by his Naval Aide and Mr. Clifford, left the ship for a brisk walk about the Naval Air Station. They returned at 0648.

A bad turn in the weather - a storm had been predicted, and it was already raining very hard at Quonset - caused the President to alter his plans to continue northward, and propose a visit to Bermuda instead, provided the British authorities there would give him assurance that there would be a minimum of ceremonial. It was proposed that a call upon the President by the


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Governor of Bermuda, and a return call by the President should end all formalities at Bermuda during the visit there. This procedure was desired so as to leave the President as free as possible to obtain rest and relaxation. The White House was informed of the President's wishes and negotiations to this end were begun at once by the State Department.

At 0715, the ship was underway from Pier 1, steaming various courses and speeds to conform to the channel. We were followed by the WEISS.

At 0742, we passed under the Saunderstown-Jamestown Bridge and stood out to sea. A southeasterly course was set in anticipation of continuing on to Bermuda. The members of the Press in the WEISS had by now suspected a change in plans, but since diplomatic arrangements had not been completed and no announcement could be made, Secretary Ross told them, in answer to their inquiry, that our present destination was a cruise to "nowhere".

At 0817, we passed Brenton Reef Lightship abeam to port, distant 1 mile. The WILLIAMSBURG settled on course 149 T, 159 PSC, with the U.S.S. WEISS, escort vessel, on station about 1000 yards astern.

At 1232, word was received through Secretary Hassett at the White House that diplomatic arrangements had been completed for our visit to Bermuda, and the Navy Department and Press were accordingly advised of our change in plans and revised requirements.

The weather was reasonably good now, with excellent visibility, but a heavy ground swell was running which caused a good deal of discomfort to those on board who had not acquired their sea legs. This heavy swell continued throughout the day, causing the ship to pitch in an uncomfortable manner. Notwithstanding this discomfort, most members of the Presidential party appeared regularly for meals.

After luncheon, a movie was shown in the main dining salon for the Presidential party. Movies were again shown in the evening. Movies shown were "Without Reservations", starring Claudette Colbert and John Wayne, and "Notorious", starring Ingrid Bergman and Cary Grant.

Wednesday, August 21st:

0000 - Steaming on course 150T, enroute Quonset Point, Rhode Island to Bermuda, in company with the U.S.S. WEISS.

The heavy ground swell continued, but by this time the majority of those on board had become used to it and there were but few casualties.

About noon, the photographers on board the U.S.S. WEISS requested, and were given permission, to take close-up photographs of the WILLIAMSBURG and the Presidential party.


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The Captain of the WEISS was directed to bring his vessel close aboard the WILLIAMSBURG for that purpose, which he did, riding about 75 yards off the port quarter while photographs were taken of the President's party and his vessel.

Upon completion of this maneuver, the WEISS dropped back into position astern.

By evening the swell had disappeared and a short chop had taken its place. The ship was now rolling moderately, but this condition did not seem to be uncomfortable in the least.

After dinner, movies were shown for the President's party in the main dining salon - "The Stranger", starring Edward G. Robinson, Loretta Young, and Orson Welles.

Thursday, August 22nd:

Dawn broke on a comparatively placid sea and a typical trade-wind sky - bright and sunny - with the ship riding smoothly.

At 0553, we sighted Bermuda, bearing 194 T, about 40,000 yards distant.

At 0740, course was changed to 270T, and preparations were made for entering port.

At 0747, the WILLIAMSBURG lay to pick up a pilot, Mr. J. Lamb, after which the ship continued on various courses into Bermuda Harbor and at 0927 moored to a buoy at the southern end of Little Sound, Port Royal Harbor about 500 yards off shore. The WEISS followed us in and moored to a pier at the Naval Operating Base.

We were met here by Secret Service agents Anderson, Kellerman, Barry, Boyd, and Boring, who had preceded us by air in order to complete necessary security arrangements.

At 0927, Lieutenant Commander A. Gray, R.N., Flag Lieutenant to Vice Admiral Sir Irvine Glennie, came aboard to convey the greetings of the Commander-in-Chief of the Royal Navy's North America and West Indies Station.

At 0928, Rear Admiral G. R. Henderson, U.S.N., Commmandant of the Naval Operating Base, Bermuda, and Mr. Clay Merrell, the Vice Consul of the United States, came aboard to pay their respects.

At 0930, Ensign Ernest G. Brock, U.S.N.R., officer mail courier, came aboard with mail from the White House. Captain Lannie Conn, U.S.N., pilot of the special mail plane that brought the courier, also came aboard, to call on Captain Foskett.

At 1000, the Governor of Bermuda, Admiral Sir Ralph Leatham, K.C.B., came aboard to call on the President and welcome him to Bermuda.

At 1003, Lieutenant Commander Gray, R.N., left the ship.


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At 1017, the Governor of the Colony left the ship.

At 1020, Captain Conn left the ship.

At 1025, Admiral Henderson and Mr. Merrell left the ship.

At 1215, the President and members of his party took a swim off the port gangway.

At 1603, the President, accompanied by his Military and Naval Aides, left the ship to return the call of the Governor. The President, on stepping ashore at Hamilton, became the first American Chief Executive to visit the Colony of Bermuda while in office. The President smilingly acknowledged the hand clapping of the orderly crowd gathered at Albuoy's Point to witness his arrival. He raised his Panama hat in response to more applause as he drove away to the Government House in the Governor's ceremonial horse-drawn landau, seated alongside the Governor.

On arrival at the Government House, they were joined by the Colonial Secretary, the Honorable William Addis, and Lady Addis, and later by the Colony's Chief Justice, Sir Brooks Francis, and Lady Francis.

The party repaired to the lawn of the Government House, where they were served tea.

At 1815, Ensign Brock left the ship with mail pouch for the White House. He was returned to Washington via Navy aircraft.

At 1825, the President and his party returned to the landing, and at 1855, they arrived on board.

At 2000, movies were shown for the crew on the forecastle - "Night and Day", starring Cary Grant and Alexis Smith.

At the Naval Operating Base, a special marine guard was posted during our visit, and picket boats, with Marine sentries embarked, circled the WILLIAMSBURG constantly to afford the President the maximum security.

Through the courtesy of Admiral Henderson and his Chief of Staff, the facilities of the Officers' Club at the Naval Operating Base were extended to the newspapermen accompanying us during our stay in Bermuda. This favor was greatly enjoyed and appreciated by the members of the Press. They were thus enabled to vacate their cramped quarters in the WEISS for the comparative luxury of the Bachelor Officers' Quarters at the Base.

Friday, August 23rd: - At Bermuda.

0000 - Moored to Buoy #3, Port Royal Harbor, Bermuda.


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At 0725, the President, Captain Foskett, and Mr. Marks left the ship by motor boat for the Naval Operating Base, where they took a 20-minute walk around the Base. The President set the pace, so it was, as usual, a brisk walk. They returned to the ship at 0800.

At 1103, Vice Admiral Sir Irvine Glennie, K.C.B., Commander in Chief of North America and West Indies Station, came aboard to call on the President. He departed at 1117.

At 1423, the President and members of his party left the ship for a fishing trip outside the barrier reef, about for-and-a-half miles off the South Shore. Mr. Stubbs, an employee of the Naval Operating Base, accompanied them as a fishing guide. The President made the first catch, a three-pound red hind. He next caught a four-point schoolmaster, and then a rock fish, the largest catch of the day, weighing six-and-a-half pounds. His Naval Aide, Captain Foskett, caught three fish, and Mr. Ted Marks, one. A heavy rain squall cut short the fishing expedition, and the President and his party returned to the ship at 1805.

At 1830, the President talked with Secretary of States Byrnes in Paris over the trans-Atlantic radiotelephone. The conversation was relayed to and from the WILLIAMSBURG by the New York office of the trans-Atlantic Telephone Service.

At 2000, movies for the crew were shown on the forecastle - "Notorious", starring Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman.

The President and his party whiled the evening away in their quarters.

Saturday, August 24th: At Bermuda.

At 0645, the President, Captain Foskett, and Mr. Clifford left the ship for a walk about the Naval Operating Base. Admiral Henderson joined the party ashore and pointed out various places of interest about the Base. The President, Mr. Clifford, and Captain Foskett returned to the ship at 0725.

At 0855, the President, his Military and Naval Aides left the ship for the Commandant's dock, where they were met by Admiral Henderson and the American Vice Consul. They embarked in on automobile for a tour of the Island. Mr. Merrell drove and acted as guide.

Captain Foskett saw them off and then returned to the ship, as he had an engagement to return Admiral Glennie's call for the President at 1100. The party stopped at an aquarium and museum at a place called Flatt's for about 15 minutes, where the President signed the register and viewed the various tropical fish on exhibit. The President also visited the home of Dr. Oglire Arton, where he examined heirlooms and antiques that have been in the Doctor's family some 300 years. The party continued to St. George's, passing Kindley Air Field along the route.

A stop was made at St. Peter's Church, where the President viewed the many historical tablets containing epitaphs to original founders of the Island. Mayor Leon Fox and the Warden of the


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Church, Mr. Robinson, joined the President and exhibited priceless silver chalices and a fruit bowl dating to the year 1600.

The party next visited the St. George's Historical Society Library Building, which has been standing since 1700. Miss Hurd, supervisor and caretaker of this library, showed the President the various antiques of the Island on exhibit.

Mr. Frank E. Gurr, President of the Society, joined the party and explained some of the historical facts to the President. Before departing, the President signed the register. The President also read a tablet erected in honor of the Reverend William Stephenson, Methodist Minister.

The President and his party next visited the Masonic Lodge. Here they saw a bible from which a flyleaf bearing the autograph of George Washington had been cut by a souvenir hunter 30 years ago. The President examined the bible and autographed it.

The party continued the tour, driving by Tom Moore's Tavern, and arrived at Mr. Merrell's residence at 1325 for luncheon. At 1100, Captain Foskett arrived at Admiralty House to return the call that Admiral Glennie had made on the President. Upon completion, he departed to join up with the President for luncheon. Captain Foskett, the President's Naval Aide, joined the party at this point. Other guests, besides Mr. and Mrs. Merrell, were Mr. Allan Jones of the War Assets Administration, and Mrs. Jones, and Mr. Richey, the Vice Consul. A commercial photographer employed by Mr. Merrell took pictures of the group.

The party departed Mr. Merrell's at 1500 and motored to the Royal Yacht Club landing in Hamilton, where they embarked in a launch, and returned to the ship at 1600.

Mr. Snyder rejoined the party this afternoon. He left Washington at 0800 and arrived at Kindley Air Field at 1315, where he was met by Admiral Henderson and Colonel Henry (the Commanding Officer of the Field.). He had luncheon at the field with the Admiral and the Colonel, after which they motored to the dock at Hamilton. Mr. Snyder arrived on board ship at 1545.

At 1420 Ensign T. F. Becker, U.S.N.R., came aboard with mail pouch from the White House. He left the ship at 1430, with return mail.

In the evening, the movie screen was rigged on the fantail, and the President and his party were shown news reels, and a film showing movies taken by the party photographer during the first three days of the cruise.

Sunday, August 25th: - At Bermuda.

The President slept late this morning and did not take his usual walk ashore. However, at 1030, he and his entire party left the ship for Hamilton to attend services in the Bermuda Episcopal Cathedral. They arrived at the Royal Yacht Club landing at 1050, and although


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automobiles were available, he and his party elected to walk, a distance of about one-quarter mile. They arrived at the Cathedral at 1057.

The services lasted for approximately an hour. Upon conclusion, the President went over and greeted the Governor, Admiral Sir Ralph Leatham, who was also in attendance. Together they left the church, stopping at the entrance to greet the Bishop of Bermuda, who had conducted the service and delivered the sermon. The President left the Governor here and he and his party then walked back to the yacht landing, embarked in his barge, and returned on board at 1225.

There were very few persons about the streets during the President's walk to and from the Church.

Before lunch the President and his Naval Aide took a 10-minute swim off the port gangway.

At 1600, Ensign Becker, officer mail courier, came aboard to pick up mail for return to the White House. He left the ship at 1650.

At 2030, movies were shown for the crew on the forecastle - "Easy to Wed", starring Van Johnson and Esther Williams. Neither the President nor any member of the party attended. They all loafed through the evening in the guests' quarters.

At 2130, mail and Sunday newspapers sent us by air from the White House arrived on board. They had been sent out from Washington by the regularly scheduled Naval Transport service plane.

Monday, August 26th: - At Bermuda.

At 0640, the President, accompanied by his Naval Aide, left the ship for his customary walk about the Naval Operating Base. They returned aboard at 0735.

At 0755, the U.S.S. MALABAR (a Navy stores ship) passed close aboard and rendered passing honors.

At 0920, Mr. Snyder, General Vaughan, Colonel Graham, Mr. Marks, Captain Foskett, and Captain Freeman, left the ship for a shopping tour in Hamilton, Bermuda. They returned aboard in the early forenoon laden with gifts for their folks back home.

At 1250, Admiral Henderson, and his Chief of Staff, Captain W.K. Rhodes, came aboard to have lunch as guests of the President. They left the ship at 1428.

In the evening, movies were shown for the President and his party on the fantail - "Centennial Summer", starring Jeanne Craine, Linda Darnell, and Cornell Wilde.

After the movies, the President and his party remained on board and spent the evening resting.


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At 0630 the WILLIAMSBURG began with preparations for moving into the dock for fresh water.

At 0653, the President and his party, except for General Vaughan, left the ship for North Rock Light, about 6 miles north of Bermuda, on another fishing expedition. They were joined by Admiral Henderson, Superintendent Miller, head of the Local Constabulary, Ed Folliard of the Washington Post, Norton Benson of the International News Photos, Al Mingalone of the Paramount News, and Mr. Stubbs, the fishing guide.

Upon arrival off North Rock Light, it was found that continuous rain and squalls had created a sea too rough for fishing, and the party turned back to the ship. Upon return to the bay, the party made another attempt at fishing, when Mr. Allen caught one fish - the only catch of the trip. The President and his party called a halt to the fishing and returned to the ship at 1218.

During the absence of the President, the WILLIAMSBURG, at 0701, got underway and went alongside the dock at the Naval Operating Base to receive fresh water. Simultaneously, the WEISS got underway from alongside the Naval Operating Base dock, and anchored in the harbor to make room for the WILLIAMSBURG.

The WILLIAMSBURG completed receiving fresh water at 1132, got underway from alongside the dock, and returned to her mooring at Buoy #3. The WEISS then returned to her berth alongside the Naval Operating Base dock.

In the evening, movies were shown for the crew on the forecastle - "Three Wise Fools", starring Margaret O'Brien, Lionel Barrymore, Edward Arnold and Levis Stone. The President and his party did not attend but spent the evening on board, resting.

Wednesday, August 28th: - At Bermuda.

Intermittent rains fell during the early forenoon, but the skies later cleared and the sun came out to make it a very pleasant day.

At 1400, Chief Yeoman Langello and Boatswain's Mate Zeiser left the ship for Kindley Air Field to meet the NATS plane due in from Washington with mail for the President and his party. They returned aboard at 1800.

At 2000, movies for the crew were shown on the forecastle - "The Stranger", starring Loretta Young and Orson Welles.

No special activity or events were scheduled for today, and the President and his party spent the entire day on board.


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Thursday, August 29th: - At Bermuda.

At 0700, the President and his entire party, except for General Vaughan, left on their third fishing expedition. Mr. Stubbs, fishing guide, who accompanied the party on its other trips, was also present. Members of the press and radio accompanying the party were: Felix Belair, New York Times; William Hillman of Mutual Broadcasting System; John Thompson, Acme Newspictures; and Al Mingalone, Paramount News. The Party was divided between two boats - Secretary Snyder, Mr. Ross, Captain Foskett and Admiral Henderson accompanying the President, while Mr. Clifford, Mr. Marks, and Colonel Graham accompanied Mr. Allen (Captain) in the second boat. Wagers were made on the combined catch of each boat.

The group proceeded to the same area visited on its first expedition, about 5 miles off the southern tip of Bermuda. Luck was good today. The President caught eight of the numerous fish caught by the party. At 1250, all returned to the ship, seemingly well satisfied with their day's efforts, both sides expecting victory. After much squabbling over the scales it was determined that the President and his team were decidedly victorious, despite the efforts of "Captain" Allen and his cohorts to increase the weight of their catch by filling a fish with lead sinkers. When they were convinced they had lost, they gallantly acknowledged their perfidy.

At 1700, the President entertained at a small reception on board in honor of His Excellency the Governor, Members of the Colonial Parliament, and other distinguished

officials and citizens of Bermuda. Those received by the President and members of his party were: His Excellency the Governor, Admiral Sir Ralph Leatham, and Lieutenant Morrison, his Aide De Camp; Vice Admiral Sir Irvine Glennie, K.C.B., and Lieutenant Commander Gray, his Flag Lieutenant; the Honorable H. B. Dill, M.C.P.; the Honorable J. W. Cox, C.B.E., M.C.P.; the Honorable J. Trounsell Gilbert, O.B.E.; Sir Howard Trott, C.B.E., M.C.P.; Eldon H. Trimingham, Esq., C.B.E., M.C.P.; Rear Admiral G. R. Henderson, U.S.N., and his Flag Lieutenant; Captain W. K. Rhodes, U.S.N.; the American Vice Consul, Mr. Clay Merrell; American Vice Consul, Earle J. Richey; Colonel Cecil S. Henry, AC, U.S.A.; and Lieutenant Commander Charles E. Nelson, U.S.N. A buffet supper and refreshments were served.

By 1815, all guests had departed.

The President and his party spent the evening on board in the guests' quarters.

Friday, August 50th: - At Bermuda.

At 0425, Mr. J. Lamb, the local pilot who was to take us out of the harbor, came aboard.

At 0540, special sea details were set preparatory to getting underway.

At 0517, the WILLIAMSBURG got underway and steamed out of the harbor. Upon passing the Royal Dockyard the President received the following message from the Governor:


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"We have deemed it a great honor that you chose Bermuda for your holiday and hope that its restful beauty has come up to your expectations. We shall always remember that you were the first President in office to visit our Colony and hope that you honor us again. In the meantime, we extend to you our very best wishes."

In return, the President dispatched the following messages of appreciation:

To the Governor;

"Thank you very much for your kind message. Everyone enjoyed our visit to Bermuda, and hope to come back. Please express my appreciation to the inhabitants of Bermuda for all their courtesy. My very best wishes to you."

To the Commandant of the U.S. Naval Operating Base;

"The President extends to the Commandant and all those under his command his heartiest appreciation for their efforts in making his stay in Bermuda a happy one. To all hands a well earned 'Well Done'".

It should be noted here that all hands at Bermuda respected the President's wishes to the letter and demands on his time were kept at an absolute minimum, thus affording him the maximum of rest and recreation. This was particularly appreciated by the President.

The WEISS followed the WILLIAMSBURG out of the harbor. The WILLIAMSBURG stopped momentarily at 0652, when the pilot left the ship.

At 0810, the group, having passed around the southern tip of the Island, settled on course 297 T, speed 14 knots, and headed for Hampton Roads, Virginia. The day was bright and sunny, and the sea was calm.

In the early afternoon, a light chop caused the ships to roll and pitch moderately.

During the afternoon, movies were shown for the President's party in the main dining salon; "Cluny Brown", starring Charles Boyer and Jennifer Jones, was the feature.

By nightfall, an uncomfortable sea had built up, causing the WILLIAMSBURG to roll and pitch noticeably, to the discomfort of many of the hands on board.

In the evening, movies for the President's party were again shown in the main dining salon - "Night and Day", starring Alexis Smith and Cary Grant.

No other special activity was scheduled and the President and his party spent the evening in their quarters.


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Saturday, August 31st:

In the WILLIAMSBURG, in company with the WEISS, steaming on course 297 T, speed 14, enroute Bermuda to Hampton Roads, Virginia.

The heavy seas still persisted, and the WILLIAMSBURG continued to roll and pitch in a disagreeable manner. The greatest roll logged was 36 degrees. Much furniture and loose gear which came adrift during the night had to be secured. There appeared to be quite a few "casualties" on board. By early afternoon, the seas had diminished, and patches of blue sky appeared through the clouds.

By evening, the ship was again riding comfortably through slight swells and the sky was clear and starlit.

The Presidential party relaxed in a big way during our return trip. Many of them logged almost unheard of hours of sleep. Because of the peculiar and disconcerting motion of the WILLIAMSBURG in a seaway, most of us aboard found a "horizontal attitude" the most prudent approach to the problem of retaining one's equilibrium.

Movies for the President's party were shown in the early afternoon and evening in the main dining salon. Movies shown were "Holiday in Mexico", starring Walter Pidgeon and Jose Iturbi, and "Three Wise Fools", starring Margaret O'Brien, Lionel Barrymore, Edward Arnold and Lewis Stone.

Sunday, September lst:

0000 - In the WILLIAMSBURG, steaming as before on course 299 T, speed 14, in company with the U.S.S. WEISS, enroute Bermuda to Hampton Roads, Virginia.

The day was bright and sunny and the sea calm - a condition which afforded us a welcome relief from the previous day.

At 0755 we sighted Cape Henry bearing 298 T, distant about 20,000 yards. At 0903, it was abeam to port, distant about 800 yards.

At 1000, General Vaughan, Colonel Graham, Mr. Marks, Mr. Clifford, Mr. Snyder, and Captain Foskett engaged in a strenuous game of volley ball (using a medicine ball) on the sun deck.

At 1023, Old Point Comfort was abeam to starboard, distant about 800 yards. At 1040, the WILLIAMSBURG anchored in Berth 27, Area F-l, Hampton Roads, Virginia, in 7 fathoms of water. The WEISS anchored about 1000 yards to port.

None of our party went ashore here, as we anchored only for the purpose of awaiting the arrival of some additional guests of the President.


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Because of the number of curious small pleasure craft that soon assembled in our vicinity, it was found necessary to put out a picket boat from the WEISS to patrol around the WILLIAMSBURG while we were anchored.

At 1210, the Honorable Robert E. Hannegan, Postmaster General, the Honorable John R. Steelman, Reconversion Director, and the Honorable William D. Hassett, Presidential Secretary, came aboard as invited guests of the President. They had been flown down from Washington to join the party.

At 1210, Ensign Brock came on board with mail from the White House. He was handed our outgoing mail and left the ship shortly afterwards to return to Washington.

At 1241, the WILLIAMSBURG and WEISS got underway and steamed up the Chesapeake Bay on various courses and speeds so as to conform to the Channel. The group proceeded up the Bay and at 1832 anchored at the mouth of the Potomac River, 3 miles north of Point Lookout, Maryland. We remained here overnight so as to be able to make a daylight passage up the Potomac River tomorrow.

In the evening, movies for the crew were shown on the forecastle - "Centennial Summer", starring Jeanne Craine, Linda Darnell, and Cornell Wilde.

The President and his party spent the evening in the guests' quarters.

Monday, September 2nd:

0000 - Anchored at the mouth of the Potomac River in 7 fathoms of water.

At 0700, the WILLIAMSBURG and WEISS got underway and proceeded up the Potomac River, enroute to the Naval Gun Factory, Washington, D.C.

During the early afternoon, a bright sun came out, which warmed up considerably an otherwise cool day. The President's party took immediate advantage of the sun, and donned bathing trunks and took to the decks. Soon a strenuous game of volley ball was in progress. When the one remaining medicine ball was lost over the side, the contest was continued with rope grommets, which had been made up in quantity and were easily replaceable. The President, Mr. Hannegan, and Mr. Allen were enthusiastic spectators, often being called upon to umpire close decisions in the hotly contested and somewhat noisy games.

At 1500, when passing Mount Vernon, the crew of the WILLIAMSBURG was assembled at quarters and paid traditional honors to our first President, George Washington. The President and his party assembled on the flying bridge, and participated in the ceremony.


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At this time, the Commanding Officer of the U.S.S. WEISS requested, and was granted, permission to proceed ahead of the WILLIAMSBURG in order that she might moor first, so that the members of the press and radio embarked might be on hand to meet the President as he left the WILLIAMSBURG.

The WEISS passed to starboard, rendered honors, and proceeded ahead.

Numerous small pleasure craft followed the WILLIAMSBURG up the river. The President was on deck now and was greeted by the holiday crowds, especially during the passing of a jam-packed excursion boat.

At 1655, the WILLIAMSBURG moored starboard side to, to Pier #1 at the Naval Gun Factory, Washington, D.C. The WEISS was moored across the pier from the WILLIAMSBURG. The newspapermen and photographers had disembarked and were awaiting the President on Pier #1.

At 1710, the President and his party disembarked for return to the White House.

Admiral Davis and Admiral Ruddock were on the dock and greeted the President as he left the ship.

The President spoke briefly to the newsmen, the photographers took pictures, and the President and his party departed for the White House.

The President, like all the members of his party, was deeply tanned and seemed very much rested and refreshed as the result of his vacation cruise.

It was a cruise that all will remember with pleasure.


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INDEX TO ANNEXES

Annex (I) - Letter of Appreciation to the Commanding Officer, U.S.S. WEISS

Annex (II) - Letter of Appreciation to the Commanding Officer, U.S. Naval Air Station, Quonset Point, Rhode Island.

Annex (III) - Letter of Appreciation to the Commandant, U.S. Naval Operating Base, Bermuda

Annex (IV) - Letter of Appreciation to the Chief of Staff of the Commandant, U.S. Naval Operating Base, Bermuda.


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September 3, 1946

My dear Lieutenant Commander Nelson:

I cannot consider my recent cruise to Narragansett Bay and Bermuda as completed until I have expressed my gratification and appreciation for the very fine services rendered by the U.S.S. WEISS as escort for the U.S.S. WILLIAMSBURG. Your ship was smartly handled at all times and every task required of her during the cruise was executed promptly and in a praiseworthy manner.

The members of the Press who were embarked in the WEISS are unanimous in their expression of thanks for the most thoughtful manner in which they were provided for. Considering the size of their party and the limitations of your ship, that accomplishment is especially noteworthy.

Will you please extend my personal thanks to the officers and enlisted personnel of the WEISS for their part in making this cruise such a happy one.

Sincerely yours,

(Sgd) HARRY S. TRUMAN

Lieutenant Commander Charles E. Nelson, U.S.N.

Commanding, U.S.S. WEISS (APA 135)

Naval Gun Factory

Washington, D. C.

Annex (I)


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September 3, 1946

My dear Captain Weller:

I should like to take this opportunity to express my appreciation for the very fine services rendered me and the members of my party during our recent visit to Quonset. I am mindful that the excellent arrangements made assured us the maximum security, comfort and pleasure during our brief visit.

The members of the Press and the Secret Service Detail are also unanimous in their expression of thanks for the most thoughtful manner in which they were provided for, and the many courtesies extended them.

I was looking forward with much pleasure to seeing you again on our return from Northern waters and regret that a change in plans precluded a return visit.

Will you please extend my personal thanks to the officers and enlisted personnel of the Naval Air Station, Quonset, for their part in making our visit there such a happy one.

Sincerely yours,

(Sgd) HARRY S. TRUMAN

Captain Oscar E. Weller, U.S.N.

Commanding, U. S. Naval Air Station,

Quonset Point, Rhode Island.

Annex (II)


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September 3, 1946

My dear Admiral Henderson:

I should like to take this opportunity to express my appreciation for the very fine services rendered me and the members of my party during our recent visit to Bermuda. I am mindful that the excellent arrangements made insured us the maximum comfort and pleasure during our brief visit.

The members of the Press and the Secret Service Detail are also unanimous in their expressions of thanks for the thoughtful manner in which they were provided for, and for the many courtesies extended to them.

Will you please extend my personal thanks to the officers and enlisted personnel of the Naval Operating Base, for their part in making our visit to Bermuda such a happy one.

Sincerely yours,

(Sgd) HARRY S. TRUMAN

Rear Admiral G. R. Henderson, U.S.N.,

Commandant, Naval Operating Base,

Bermuda.

Annex (III)


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September 3, 1946

My dear Captain Rhodes:

I have written Admiral Henderson to tell him how very much I, and the members of my party, enjoyed our visit at Bermuda but I should like to let you know how mindful I am that the excellent arrangements made for our comfort and pleasure were in no small part due to your untiring efforts. Particularly are the members of the Press and the Secret Service Detail in high praise of the thoughtful care afforded them and the many courtesies extended to them during their stay at Bermuda.

Sincerely yours,

(Sgd) HARRY S. TRUMAN

Captain W. K. Rhodes, U.S.N.,

Chief of Staff,

Commandant, U. S. Naval Operating Base,

Bermuda.

Annex (IV)


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